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The Effect of Gender-Targeted Conditional Cash Transfers on Household Expenditures: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Armand, Alex

    () (University of Navarra)

  • Attanasio, Orazio

    () (University College London)

  • Carneiro, Pedro

    () (University College London)

  • Lechene, Valerie

    () (University College London)

Abstract

This paper studies the differential effect of targeting cash transfers to men or women on the structure of household expenditures on non-durables. We study a policy intervention in the Republic of Macedonia, offering cash transfers to poor households, conditional on having their children attending secondary school. The recipient of the transfer is randomized across municipalities to be either the household head or the mother. Using data collected to evaluate the conditional cash transfer program, we show that the gender of the recipient has an effect on the structure of expenditure shares. Targeting transfers to women increases the expenditure share on food by about 4 to 5%. To study the allocation of expenditures within the food basket, we estimate a demand system for food and we find that targeting payments to mothers induces, for different food categories, not only a significant intercept shift, but also a change in the slope of the Engel curve.

Suggested Citation

  • Armand, Alex & Attanasio, Orazio & Carneiro, Pedro & Lechene, Valerie, 2016. "The Effect of Gender-Targeted Conditional Cash Transfers on Household Expenditures: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 10133, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10133
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    Cited by:

    1. Donni, Olivier & Molina, José Alberto, 2018. "Household Collective Models: Three Decades of Theoretical Contributions and Empirical Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 11915, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Robert A. Pollak, 2017. "How Bargaining in Marriage drives Marriage Market Equilibrium," NBER Working Papers 24000, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Blagica Petreski & Marjan Petreski, 2018. "Analysis of the public spending on education and on social protection of children in the country," Finance Think Policy Studies 2018-12/20, Finance Think - Economic Research and Policy Institute.
    4. Robert A. Pollak, 2018. "How Bargaining in Marriage Drives Marriage Market Equilibrium," Working Papers 2018-004, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    5. Ringdal, Charlotte & Sjursen, Ingrid Hoem, 2017. "Household bargaining and spending on children: Experimental evidence from Tanzania," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 19/2017, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    6. Lucía Echeverria & Martina Menon & Federico Perali & Miriam Berges, 2019. "Intra-Household Inequality and Child Welfare in Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0241, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    7. Ingvild Almås & Johannes Haushofer & Jeremy P. Shapiro, 2019. "The Income Elasticity for Nutrition: Evidence from Unconditional Cash Transfers in Kenya," NBER Working Papers 25711, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Chiappori, Pierre-André & Molina, José Alberto & Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Velilla, Jorge, 2019. "Intertemporal Labor Supply and Intra-Household Commitment," IZA Discussion Papers 12353, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    CCT; intra-household; gender; expenditure;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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