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How Ya Gonna Keep ‘Em Down on the Farm: Which Land Grant Graduates Live in Rural Areas?

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  • Artz, Georgeanne M.
  • Yu, Li

Abstract

Out-migration of college-educated youth from rural areas of the United States is a persistent trend and a salient concern for rural development practitioners. Using a unique dataset compiled from a survey of alumni graduating from a major Midwestern Land Grant University between 1982 and 2006, we address four policy relevant questions pertaining to rural brain drain: which college graduates choose to live in rural areas, how do rural alumni's career goals differ from those of urban alumni, how do occupation and income differ across these groups and is interest in rural living increasing or decreasing over time? We find strong evidence of brain drain from rural areas roughly 75 percent of rural born alumni lived in urban areas at the time of survey. Rural alumni tend to be rural born, have majors in the College of Agriculture and work or start business in the agriculture-related industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Artz, Georgeanne M. & Yu, Li, 2009. "How Ya Gonna Keep ‘Em Down on the Farm: Which Land Grant Graduates Live in Rural Areas?," Staff General Research Papers Archive 13094, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:13094
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    Cited by:

    1. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman & M. Rose Olfert & Ying Tan, 2015. "When Spatial Equilibrium Fails: Is Place-Based Policy Second Best?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(8), pages 1303-1325, August.
    2. M. Olfert & Murray Jelinski & Dimitrios Zikos & John Campbell, 2012. "Human capital drift up the urban hierarchy: veterinarians in Western Canada," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 49(2), pages 551-570, October.
    3. M. Rose Olfert & Mark D. Partridge, 2010. "Best Practices in Twenty-First-Century Rural Development and Policy," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(2), pages 147-164.
    4. Ann Marie Fiore & Linda S. Niehm & Jessica L. Hurst & Jihyeong Son & Amrut Sadachar & Daniel W. Russell & David Swenson & Christopher Seeger, 2015. "Will They Stay or Will They Go? Community Features Important in Migration Decisions of Recent University Graduates," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 29(1), pages 23-37, February.

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