IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/isd/wpaper/72.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Did Men Benefit More from Medical Progress in Recent Decades? Cause-of-Death Contributions to the Decreasing Sex-Gap in Life Expectancy in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Magdalena Muszyñska

    (Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics)

  • Roland Rau Roland

    (Demographic Research, University of Rostock)

Abstract

BACKGROUND The narrowing of the sex gap in life-expectancy since the mid-1970s in the United States has been explained by women’s growing involvement in previously male-dominated risky behaviours, and in particular tobacco consumption. We argue that the narrowing sex-gap could additionally have resulted from greater benefits to men than women from new medical technologies due to differential access and the fact that many medical solutions result from studies based entirely on men. METHODS We decompose the sex gap in the mean duration of life between ages 0 and 75 into four large cause of death groups according to the index of amenable mortality. FINDINGS In the studied years, with the exception of 1985-1995, the sex gap decreased due to causes amenable to public policy interventions. An important contributor to this change was increased smoking among women. The observed narrowing of the sex gap due to medically amenable causes is limited to age 0. When a new group of causes amenable to medical interventions was formed by including half of the contribution of IHD, it had a positive contribution to the narrowing sex gap, and in particular at ages 1-75 years. CONCLUSIONS We demonstrate that when the group of medically amenable causes of death includes half of the contribution of IHD, the narrowing-sex gap in life-expectancy results from the two sexes benefiting to a different degree from medical developments due to differential access or from the fact that treatments are better fitted to male physiological needs than those of women.

Suggested Citation

  • Magdalena Muszyñska & Roland Rau Roland, 2014. "Did Men Benefit More from Medical Progress in Recent Decades? Cause-of-Death Contributions to the Decreasing Sex-Gap in Life Expectancy in the United States," Working Papers 72, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isd:wpaper:72
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://kolegia.sgh.waw.pl/pl/KAE/struktura/ISiD/publikacje/Documents/Working_Paper/ISID_WP_42_2014.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anne Case & Christina Paxson, 2005. "Sex differences in morbidity and mortality," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(2), pages 189-214, May.
    2. Nolte, Ellen & Scholz, Rembrandt & Shkolnikov, Vladimir & McKee, Martin, 2002. "The contribution of medical care to changing life expectancy in Germany and Poland," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(11), pages 1905-1921, December.
    3. Hurd, Michael D. & McGarry, Kathleen, 1997. "Medical insurance and the use of health care services by the elderly," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 129-154, April.
    4. repec:cai:popine:popu_p1985_40n4-5_0770 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. France Meslé & Jacques Vallin, 2006. "Diverging Trends in Female Old‐Age Mortality: The United States and the Netherlands versus France and Japan," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 32(1), pages 123-145, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Mine Kühn & Christian Dudel & Tobias C. Vogt & Anna Oksuzyan, 2017. "Trends in gender differences in health and mortality at working ages among West and East Germans," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2017-009, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Thomas Leoni, 2011. "Fehlzeitenreport 2011. Krankheits- und unfallbedingte Fehlzeiten in Österreich," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 42691, July.
    3. Quitterie Roquebert & Jonathan Sicsic & Thomas Rapp, 2021. "Health measures and long-term care use in the European frail population," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 22(3), pages 405-423, April.
    4. Clémence Kieny & Gabriela Flores & Jürgen Maurer, 2021. "Assessing and decomposing gender differences in evaluative and emotional well-being among older adults in the developing world," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 189-221, March.
    5. Pedro Albarran Pérez & Marisa Hidalgo Hidalgo & Iñigo Iturbe-Ormaetxe Kortajarene, 2017. "Schooling and adult health: Can education overcome bad early-life conditions?," Working Papers. Serie AD 2017-09, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    6. Andrea M. Mühlenweg & Franz G. Westermaier & Brant Morefield, 2016. "Parental health and child behavior: evidence from parental health shocks," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 577-598, September.
    7. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Mona Larsen, 2010. "The impact of health on individual retirement plans: self‐reported versus diagnostic measures," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(7), pages 792-813, July.
    8. Haan, Peter & Prowse, Victoria, 2014. "Longevity, life-cycle behavior and pension reform," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 178(P3), pages 582-601.
    9. Tansel, Aysit & Karaoglan, Deniz, 2014. "Health behaviors and education in Turkey," MPRA Paper 57322, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 15 Jul 2014.
    10. Coelho, Marta & de Meza, David, 2012. "Do bad risks know it? Experimental evidence on optimism and adverse selection," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 114(2), pages 168-171.
    11. Timothy J. Halliday, 2008. "Heterogeneity, state dependence and health," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 11(3), pages 499-516, November.
    12. Cally Ardington & Anne Case & Mahnaz Islam & David Lam & Murray Leibbrandt & Alicia Menendez & Analia Olgiati, 2009. "The impact of AIDS on intergenerational support in South Africa: Evidence from the Cape Area Panel Study," SALDRU Working Papers 27, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    13. Thomas C. Buchmueller & Agnès Couffinhal & Michel Grignon & Marc Perronnin, 2004. "Access to physician services: does supplemental insurance matter? Evidence from France," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 669-687, July.
    14. Timothy Halliday, 2006. "Income Risk and Health," Working Papers 200612, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    15. Timothy Halliday, 2006. "The Impact of Aggregate and Idiosyncratic Income Shocks on Health Outcomes: Evidence from the PSID," Working Papers 200606, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    16. David E Bloom & Michael Kuhn & Klaus Prettner, 2020. "The contribution of female health to economic development [The costs of missing the Millennium Development Goal on gender equity]," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 130(630), pages 1650-1677.
    17. Angela Lyons & Hyungsoo Kim, 2007. "No Pain, No Strain: Impact of Health on the Financial Security of Older Americans," NFI Working Papers 2007-WP-12, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
    18. Dahlin, Johanna & Härkönen, Juho, 2013. "Cross-national differences in the gender gap in subjective health in Europe: Does country-level gender equality matter?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 24-28.
    19. Brenda Gannon & Bérengère Davin, 2010. "Use of formal and informal care services among older people in Ireland and France," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 11(5), pages 499-511, October.
    20. Chen, Chin-Shyan & Liu, Tsai-Ching & Chen, Li-Mei, 2003. "National Health Insurance and the antenatal care use: a case in Taiwan," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 99-112, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    sex-gap in mortality; causes of death; medically amenable mortality; policy amenable mortality; sex differences in life expectancy; United States;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J19 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Other
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:isd:wpaper:72. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/issghpl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Milena Borkowska (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/issghpl.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.