IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Managing migration in the Philippines: Lessons for India


  • S. Iruday Rajan

    () (Centre for Development Studies)

  • U.S Mishra

    () (Centre for Development Studies)


This paper highlights the significance of international migration in the Philippines economy and society, discusses the supportive and regulatory role that the government of the Philippines plays in promoting it and draws the lessons that India might learn from the Philippines experience. Temporary labour migration to foreign countries is a policy priority of the Government of the Philippines which restricts official access to markets through recruitment by licensed agencies or the government itself. The Government retains a regulatory role, though most of the responsibility for recruiting workers is entrusted with the private sector with a view to protecting workers from abuse and discouraging illegal recruitment. International migrants receive several benefits- pre migration training, life insurance, pensions and loan facilities. Remittances are encouraged and investment programmes are offered. Filipinos abroad are given psychological counselling to maintain Filipino values and offered rights to vote in national elections. The Philippines government also lends its support to return migrants through tax-free shopping facilities, investment loans and subsidised scholarships. The efforts of the government have yielded substantial results even though short comings and failures do remain. The gains of government policies however far outweigh their inadequencies. India has several lessons to draw from the Philippines experiment in order to organise systematic flows of emigrants from India, namely to take care of their working and living conditions abroad, to channel emigrants' savings into productive uses, to promote welfare funds of emigrant workers, to protect the interests of workers abroad during their sojourn and after return, to offer intending emigrants pre-departure orientation courses, to prevent all practices of breach of contract on the part of recruitment agencies and foreign employers and to increase the investment of Indian embassies in the affairs of Indian emigrants.

Suggested Citation

  • S. Iruday Rajan & U.S Mishra, 2007. "Managing migration in the Philippines: Lessons for India," Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum Working Papers 393, Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum, India.
  • Handle: RePEc:ind:cdswpp:393

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. M. H. Suryanarayana, 2001. "Economic reform versus food security: Kerala's Gordian knot," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(2), pages 239-253.
    2. Dibyendu S. Maiti, 2005. "Organisational morphology of rural industries in liberalised India: A study of West Bengal," Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum Working Papers 371, Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum, India.
    3. Sunil Mani, 2005. "Keeping pace with globalisation innovation capability in Korea's telecommunications equipment industry," Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum Working Papers 370, Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum, India.
    4. Ellis, Frank, 2000. "Rural Livelihoods and Diversity in Developing Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198296966.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. S. Irudaya Rajan & Zachariah KC, 2009. "Costs of Basic Services in Kerala, 2007, Education, Health, Childbirth and Finance (Loans)," Working Papers id:1837, eSocialSciences.

    More about this item


    Migration; Remittances; Employment; The Philippines;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ind:cdswpp:393. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shamprasad M. Pujar). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.