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Competitive Liberalization and Global Free Trade: A Vision for the Early 21st Century

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  • C. Fred Bergsten

    () (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

Abstract

A large part of the world has eliminated all barriers to trade or is in the process of doing so. The fifteen members of the European Union have created a "single internal market." Australia and New Zealand have completed their free trade area. Several large groupings are en route to a similar outcome: the North American Free Trade Agreement (Canada, Mexico, United States), Mercosur (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay), and the ASEAN Free Trade Agreement (Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and now Vietnam). There are numerous free trade areas among smaller countries.

Suggested Citation

  • C. Fred Bergsten, 1996. "Competitive Liberalization and Global Free Trade: A Vision for the Early 21st Century," Working Paper Series WP96-15, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:iie:wpaper:wp96-15
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    Cited by:

    1. Barry Eichengreen & Douglas A. Irwin, 2008. "International Economic Policy: Was There a Bush Doctrine?," NBER Working Papers 13831, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Simon J. Evenett & Michael Meier, 2008. "An Interim Assessment of the US Trade Policy of 'Competitive Liberalization'," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(1), pages 31-66, January.
    3. Baccini, Leonardo, 2012. "Democratization and trade policy: an empirical analysis of developing countries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 44924, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Scott L. Baier & Jeffrey H. Bergstrand & Peter Egger & Patrick A. McLaughlin, 2008. "Do Economic Integration Agreements Actually Work? Issues in Understanding the Causes and Consequences of the Growth of Regionalism," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(4), pages 461-497, April.
    5. Soamiely Andriamananjara, 2003. "Competitive Liberalization or Competitive Diversion? The Relationship between Preferential Trade Agreements and the Multilateral Trading System," International Trade 0305002, EconWPA.
    6. Jeffrey J. Schott, 2011. "The Future of the Multilateral Trading System in a Multi-polar World," Chapters,in: Regional Integration, Economic Development and Global Governance, chapter 5 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Baccini, Leonardo & Lenzi, Veronica & Thurner, Paul W., 2013. "Global energy governance: trade, infrastructure, and the diffusion of international organizations," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 62309, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Scott L. BAIER & Jeffrey H. BERGSTRAND & Peter EGGER, 2009. "The Growth Of Regional Economic Integration Agreements And The Middle East," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 29, pages 11-30.
    9. Jean-Christophe Bureau & Houssein Guimbard & Sébastien Jean, 2016. "Competing Liberalizations: Tariffs and Trade in the 21st Century," Working Papers 2016-12, CEPII research center.
    10. Antoni Estevadeordal & Kati Suominen, 2008. "Sequencing Regional Trade Integration and Cooperation Agreements," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(1), pages 112-140, January.
    11. Andrew Stoler, 2003. "Australia-USA Free Trade: Competitive Liberalisation at Work in 2003," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 10(4), pages 291-306.

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