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Occupational pension value in the public and private sectors

Author

Listed:
  • Rowena Crawford

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Institute for Fiscal Studies)

  • Carl Emmerson

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Institute for Fiscal Studies)

  • Gemma Tetlow

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies)

Abstract

It is well known that in the UK defined benefit pensions are more prevalent in the public sector than in the private sector. Furthermore, we find that the average value of accrual to members of both defined benefit pensions and defined contribution pensions is lower in the private sector than in the public sector. As a result of both these factors, we find that the average value of pension accrual is much higher in the public sector than in the private sector. Due to the long-running shift away from defined benefit pensions to less generous workplace defined contribution pensions in the private sector continuing between 2001 and 2005 the difference in average pension accrual between the sectors increased over this period. While on average over this period earnings in the public sector grew 3.5% faster than in the private sector, including pension accrual increases this difference by one-third to 4.7%. We simulate a plausible reform to the public sector defined benefit pensions - an increase in the normal pension age from 60 to 65 for future pension accrual of all current members. We find that, had this reform been implemented between 2001 and 2005, average growth in total remuneration over this period in the public sector would actually have been almost the same as that in the private sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Rowena Crawford & Carl Emmerson & Gemma Tetlow, 2010. "Occupational pension value in the public and private sectors," IFS Working Papers W10/03, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:10/03
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    File URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/wps/wp1003.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander M. Danzer & Peter Dolton & Chiara Rosazza Bondibene, 2016. "Who Wins? Evaluating the Impact of UK Public Sector Pension Scheme Reforms," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 237(1), pages 38-46, August.
    2. Danzer, Alexander M. & Dolton, Peter J., 2012. "Total Reward and pensions in the UK in the public and private sectors," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 584-594.
    3. Danzer, Alexander M. & Dolton, Peter, 2011. "Total Reward in the UK in the Public and Private Sectors," IZA Discussion Papers 5656, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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