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Specialisation Patterns and the Synchronicity of Regional Employment Cycles in Europe

This paper examines the degree of correlation of EU regional employment cycles and attempts to show whether these cycles reflect changing patterns of specialisation. By focusing on the regional level and by employing three different indicators of similarity of sectoral structure, it improves on existing studies. A dynamic panel data model is estimated pairs of regions by within groups, i.e., by a standard fixed effects estimator. Special attention is paid to capture the rich dynamics which are typical of employment data. The key finding is that employment growth is more synchronised when regions look alike in their sectoral structure.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany in its series Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim with number 210/2002.

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Date of creation: 2002
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Handle: RePEc:hoh:hohdip:210
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  1. Greenaway, David & Hine, Robert C., 1990. "Intra Industry Specialisation, Trade Expansion and Adjustment in the European Economic Space," Working Paper Series 281, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  2. Jean IMBS, 1998. "Co-Fluctuations," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 9819, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
  3. Artis, Michael J & Zhang, Wenda, 1995. "International Business Cycles and the ERM: Is there a European Business Cycle?," CEPR Discussion Papers 1191, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  7. Matthew Higgins & Egon Zakrajsek, 1999. "Purchasing power parity: three stakes through the heart of the unit root null," Staff Reports 80, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  8. Lucrezia Reichlin & Mario Forni, 1999. "National policies and local economies: Europe and the United States," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/10181, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  9. Krugman, Paul, 1998. "What's New about the New Economic Geography?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 7-17, Summer.
  10. Babetskii, Ian & Boone, Laurence & Maurel, Mathilde, 2002. "Exchange Rate Regimes and Supply Shocks Asymmetry: The Case of the Accession Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 3408, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  11. M. Amiti, 1997. "Specialisation patterns in Europe," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20321, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  12. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Andrew K. Rose, 1996. "The Endogeneity of the Optimum Currency Area Criteria," NBER Working Papers 5700, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  14. Krieger-Boden, Christiane, 1999. "Nationale und regionale Spezialisierungsmuster im europäischen Integrationsprozeß," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 2294, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
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  17. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-99, June.
  18. Mary Amiti, 1997. "Specialisation Patterns in Europe," CEP Discussion Papers dp0363, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  19. Maria Caporale, Guglielmo & Pittis, Nikitas, 1999. "Is Europe an Optimum Currency Area? Business Cyc1es in the EU," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 14, pages 169-202.
  20. Todd E. Clark & Kwanho Shin, 1998. "The sources of fluctuations within and across countries," Research Working Paper 98-04, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
  21. K.H. Midelfart & H.G. Overman & S.J. Redding & A.J. Venables, 2000. "The location of European industry," European Economy - Economic Papers 142, Directorate General Economic and Monetary Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
  22. Ansgar Belke & Jens Heine, 2007. "On the endogeneity of an exogenous OCA-criterion: specialisation and the correlation of regional business cycles in Europe," Empirica, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 15-44, March.
  23. Finger, J M & Kreinin, M E, 1979. "A Measure of 'Export Similarity' and Its Possible Uses," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 89(356), pages 905-12, December.
  24. Inklaar, Robert & de Haan, Jakob, 2001. "Is There Really a European Business Cycle? A Comment," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(2), pages 215-20, April.
  25. Marius Brülhart & Robert Elliott, 2002. "Labour-market effects of intra-industry trade: Evidence for the United Kingdom," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 138(2), pages 207-228, June.
  26. Levin, Andrew & Lin, Chien-Fu & James Chu, Chia-Shang, 2002. "Unit root tests in panel data: asymptotic and finite-sample properties," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 1-24, May.
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