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Changes in Swedish Labour Immigration Policy: A Slight Revolution?

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  • Cerna, Lucie

    () (Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS)

Abstract

This paper examines changes in Swedish labour immigration policy from early 2000s, but particular attention is paid to recent changes. The new Immigration Law of 2008 liberalised immigration policy and made it more employer-driven. These changes are called by some as ‘slight revolution’. The paper analyses the preferences of three main actors (native high-skilled labour, native low-skilled labour and capital), the coalitions built between them and the institutional constraints in order to explain labour immigration changes. It draws on the examination of media coverage, elite interviews, and labour relations and political representation literature. The paper also provides a first evaluation of the new immigration policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Cerna, Lucie, 2009. "Changes in Swedish Labour Immigration Policy: A Slight Revolution?," SULCIS Working Papers 2009:10, Stockholm University, Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:sulcis:2009_010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Yannu Zheng & Olof Ejermo, 2015. "How do the foreign-born perform in inventive activity? Evidence from Sweden," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(3), pages 659-695, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour immigration; labour market relations; political economy; public policy; Sweden;

    JEL classification:

    • F50 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - General
    • J50 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - General
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

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