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Who Goes to College? Features of Institutional Tracking in Japanese Higher Education




Features of institutional tracking play a key role in shaping an individual fs access to and advancement through higher education in Japan. This paper brings institutional tracking features to the foreground and examines the process by which individuals advance from middle school to high school, and ultimately to college. The analysis also accounts for social origin effects, thereby allowing us to re-examine claims of meritocracy in conjunction with institutional tracking effects. I find support for a tournament-like mobility of individuals in the system of higher education in Japan, where those who move down don ft move up again. My research also finds strong evidence that social origin matters, and that institutional tracking affects men and women in different ways.

Suggested Citation

  • Ono, Hiroshi, 2000. "Who Goes to College? Features of Institutional Tracking in Japanese Higher Education," EIJS Working Paper Series 95, Stockholm School of Economics, The European Institute of Japanese Studies, revised 20 Apr 2001.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:eijswp:0095

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Poh Lin Tan & S. Philip Morgan & Emilio Zagheni, 2016. "A Case for “Reverse One-Child” Policies in Japan and South Korea? Examining the Link Between Education Costs and Lowest-Low Fertility," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(3), pages 327-350, June.
    2. King, C. Judson & Douglass, John Aubrey & Feller, Irwin, 2007. "The Crisis of the Publics: An International Comparative Discussion on Higher Education Reforms and Possible Implications for US Public Universities," University of California at Berkeley, Center for Studies in Higher Education qt0028f6pp, Center for Studies in Higher Education, UC Berkeley.

    More about this item


    institutional tracking; tournament mobility; higher education;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • N35 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Asia including Middle East


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