IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hhs/ctswps/2012_027.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Estimating non-marginal willingness to pay for railway noise abatement: application of the two-step hedonic regression technique

Author

Listed:

Abstract

In this study we estimate the demand for peace and quiet, and thus also the willingness to pay for railway noise abatement, based on both steps of the hedonic model regression on property prices. The estimated demand relationship suggests welfare gains for a 1 dB reduction of railway noise as; USD 162 per individual per year at the baseline noise level of 71 dB, and USD 86 at the baseline noise level of 61 dB. Below a noise level of 49.1 dB, individuals have no willingness to pay for railway noise abatement. Our results also show the risk of using benefit transfer, i.e. we show empirically that the estimated implicit price for peace and quiet differs substantially across the housing markets. From a policy perspective our results are useful, not only for benefit-cost analysis, but also as the monetary component on infrastructure use charges that internalize the noise externality.

Suggested Citation

  • Swärdh, Jan-Erik & Andersson, Henrik & Jonsson, Lina & Ögren, Mikael, 2012. "Estimating non-marginal willingness to pay for railway noise abatement: application of the two-step hedonic regression technique," Working papers in Transport Economics 2012:27, CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI).
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ctswps:2012_027
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.transportportal.se/SWoPEc/CTS-2012-27.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. McMillen, Daniel P., 2004. "Airport expansions and property values: the case of Chicago O'Hare Airport," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 627-640, May.
    2. Brett Day & Ian Bateman & Iain Lake, 2007. "Beyond implicit prices: recovering theoretically consistent and transferable values for noise avoidance from a hedonic property price model," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 37(1), pages 211-232, May.
    3. Dekkers, Jasper E.C. & van der Straaten, J. Willemijn, 2009. "Monetary valuation of aircraft noise: A hedonic analysis around Amsterdam airport," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(11), pages 2850-2858, September.
    4. Wilhelmsson, Mats, 2002. "Household Expenditure Patterns for Housing Attributes: A Linear Expenditure System with Hedonic Prices," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 75-93, March.
    5. Ivar Ekeland & James J. Heckman & Lars Nesheim, 2004. "Identification and Estimation of Hedonic Models," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(S1), pages 60-109, February.
    6. Cameron,A. Colin & Trivedi,Pravin K., 2008. "Microeconometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9787111235767.
    7. Henrik Andersson & Lina Jonsson & Mikael Ögren, 2010. "Property Prices and Exposure to Multiple Noise Sources: Hedonic Regression with Road and Railway Noise," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 45(1), pages 73-89, January.
    8. Andersson, Henrik & Ögren, Mikael, 2007. "Noise charges in railway infrastructure: A pricing schedule based on the marginal cost principle," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 204-213, May.
    9. Pope, Jaren C., 2008. "Buyer information and the hedonic: The impact of a seller disclosure on the implicit price for airport noise," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 498-516, March.
    10. Boes, Stefan & Nüesch, Stephan, 2011. "Quasi-experimental evidence on the effect of aircraft noise on apartment rents," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 196-204, March.
    11. Won Kim, Chong & Phipps, Tim T. & Anselin, Luc, 2003. "Measuring the benefits of air quality improvement: a spatial hedonic approach," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 24-39, January.
    12. Niskanen, William A & Hanke, Steve H, 1977. "Land Prices Substantially Underestimate the Value of Environmental Quality," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 59(3), pages 375-377, August.
    13. Kenneth A. Small & Seiji S.C. Steimetz, 2012. "Spatial Hedonics And The Willingness To Pay For Residential Amenities," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(4), pages 635-647, October.
    14. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    15. repec:dau:papers:123456789/6486 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Jon P. Nelson, 2004. "Meta-Analysis of Airport Noise and Hedonic Property Values," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 38(1), pages 1-27, January.
    17. Nijland, H. A. & Van Kempen, E. E. M. M. & Van Wee, G. P. & Jabben, J., 2003. "Costs and benefits of noise abatement measures," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 131-140, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Benefits transfer; Hedonic regression; Railway noise; Willingness to pay;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C26 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:ctswps:2012_027. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (CTS). General contact details of provider: http://www.cts.kth.se/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.