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The „Chinese style reforms” and the Hungarian „Goulash Communism”


  • Maria Csanadi

    () (Institute of Economics - Hungarian Academy of Sciences)


Similarities and differences will be demonstrated between Chinese and Hungarian party-state systems. We define the role of reforms in the self-reproduction of both party-states. We shall demonstrate how different patterns of power distribution lead to the implementation of different reforms. We shall describe how these different reforms have created the Hungarian “Goulash communism” and the “Chinese style” reforms. We shall also explain the conditions that have lead “Goulash communism” to political transformation first in Hungary accompanied by economic crisis, and “Chinese style reforms” to economic transformation first in China, accompanied by macroeconomic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Csanadi, 2009. "The „Chinese style reforms” and the Hungarian „Goulash Communism”," IEHAS Discussion Papers 0903, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:has:discpr:0903

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. McMillan, John & Naughton, Barry, 1992. "How to Reform a Planned Economy: Lessons from China," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(1), pages 130-143, Spring.
    2. Gordon, Roger H & Li, David Daokui, 1997. "Government Distributional Concerns and Economic Policy During the Transition from Socialism," CEPR Discussion Papers 1662, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    More about this item


    reforms; transformation; party-state systems; goulash communism; Chinese style reforms;

    JEL classification:

    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • P2 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies
    • P3 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions
    • P41 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform
    • P52 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Studies of Particular Economies

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