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Sharing aggregate risks under moral hazard


  • Gabrielle Demange

    (PSE - Paris School of Economics, PJSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)


This paper analyzes the efficient design of insurance schemes in the presence of aggregate shocks and moral hazard. The population is divided into groups, the labour force in different sectors for instance. In each group, individuals are ex ante identical but are subject to idiosyncratic shocks. Without moral hazard, optimality requires (1) full insurance against idiosyncratic shocks, which gives rise to a representative agent for each group and (2) optimal sharing of macro-economic risks between these representative agents. The paper investigates what remains of this analysis when the presence of moral hazard conflicts with the full insurance of idiosyncratic shocks. In particular, how is the sharing of macro-economic risks across groups affected by the partial insurance against idiosyncratic risks? The design of unemployment insurance schemes in different economic sectors, and the design of pension annuities in an unfunded social security system are two potential applications.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabrielle Demange, 2008. "Sharing aggregate risks under moral hazard," PSE Working Papers halshs-00586739, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-00586739
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:red:issued:13-192 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Vitor F. Luz & Carlos E. da Costa, 2010. "The Private Memory of Aggregate Shocks," 2010 Meeting Papers 368, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Mohamed Belhaj & Renaud Bourl?s & Fr?d?ric Dero?an, 2014. "Risk-Taking and Risk-Sharing Incentives under Moral Hazard," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(1), pages 58-90, February.
    4. Florian Scheuer, 2013. "Optimal Asset Taxes in Financial Markets with Aggregate Uncertainty," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(3), pages 405-420, July.
    5. Vitor F. Luz & Carlos E. da Costa, 2011. "Separability and Memory: Micro Causes, Macro Consequences," 2011 Meeting Papers 916, Society for Economic Dynamics.


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