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Liquidity in European Equity ETFs: What Really Matters?

Author

Listed:
  • Laurent Deville

    () (GREDEG - Groupe de Recherche en Droit, Economie et Gestion - UNS - Université Nice Sophia Antipolis - UCA - Université Côte d'Azur - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • A. Calamia

    (GREDEG - Groupe de Recherche en Droit, Economie et Gestion - UNS - Université Nice Sophia Antipolis - UCA - Université Côte d'Azur - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Fabrice Riva

    (LEM - Lille - Economie et Management - UCL - Université catholique de Lille - Université de Lille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

Despite the importance ETFs have recently gained, little is known about their liquidity. The conventional view on ETF liquidity is that what really matters is not the size of the ETF or its trading volume but the liquidity of its benchmark index. We argue that while creation/redemption effectively creates a tight link between the ETF and the index liquidity, other factors are likely to affect the former. The aim of our paper is to provide empirical evidence of the determinants of the spreads in the European equity ETF markets from their inception in 2000 to the end of 2011. We find that, while the liquidity of ETFs effectively depends on the liquidity of their benchmark index, size also matters: larger and more heavily traded ETFs display tighter spreads. We also find that synthetic ETFs exhibit lower spreads than physical ETFs but that this effect becomes insignificant when competition is accounted for. Finally, market fragmentation also affects spreads but does so differently in physical and synthetic ETFs, which may be explained by the degree of fragmentation these ETFs really face.

Suggested Citation

  • Laurent Deville & A. Calamia & Fabrice Riva, 2013. "Liquidity in European Equity ETFs: What Really Matters?," Post-Print halshs-00861646, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00861646
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00861646
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hassine, Marlène & Roncalli, Thierry, 2013. "Measuring Performance of Exchange Traded Funds," MPRA Paper 44298, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Laurent Deville & Fabrice Riva, 2007. "Liquidity and Arbitrage in Options Markets: A Survival Analysis Approach," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 11(3), pages 497-525.
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    10. Goyenko, Ruslan Y. & Holden, Craig W. & Trzcinka, Charles A., 2009. "Do liquidity measures measure liquidity?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(2), pages 153-181, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lechman, Ewa & Marszk, Adam, 2015. "ICT technologies and financial innovations: The case of exchange traded funds in Brazil, Japan, Mexico, South Korea and the United States," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 355-376.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    synthetic replication; index; physical replication; ETFs; liquidity;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)

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