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Breaking up a customs union: The case of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1919

Author

Listed:
  • Georges De Menil

    (DELTA - Département et Laboratoire d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Mathilde Maurel

    () (DELTA - Département et Laboratoire d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

Breaking Up a Customs Union: The Case of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1919. — This study has used new estimates of the gravity model to analyze the effects on European trade patterns in the mid-1920s of the break-up of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and its customs union after World War I. The gravity equation has been found to explain 70 percent of the variance of the trade flows of the principal trading nations in 1924–26. Moreover, the ties between the former members of the Austro-Hungarian Empire remained stronger than any other commercial relationship in Europe. They were second only in intensity — given economic and demographic factors — to those of the British Empire.

Suggested Citation

  • Georges De Menil & Mathilde Maurel, 1994. "Breaking up a customs union: The case of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1919," Post-Print halshs-00468836, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00468836
    DOI: 10.1007/BF02707613
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00468836
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Komlos, 1983. "The Habsburg Monarchy as a Customs Union: Economic Development in Austria-Hungary in the Nineteenth Century," Books by John Komlos, Department of Economics, University of Munich, number 4, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Babetskaia-Kukharchuk, Oxana & Maurel, Mathilde, 2004. "Russia's accession to the WTO: the potential for trade increase," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 680-699, December.
    2. Jan Fidrmuc & Jarko Fidrmuc, 2003. "Disintegration and Trade," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(5), pages 811-829, November.
    3. Jarko Fidrmuc & Jan Fidrmuc, 2000. "Integration, Disintegration and Trade in Europe: Evolution of Trade Relations During the 1990s," Working Papers 42, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
    4. Beestermöller, Matthias & Rauch, Ferdinand, 2014. "A Dissection of Trading Capital: Cultural persistence of trade in the aftermath of the fall of the Iron Curtain," Discussion Papers in Economics 21688, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    5. Marc Flandreau & Mathilde Maurel, 2001. "Monetary Union, Trade Integration, and Business Cycles in 19th Century Europe: Just Do It," Working Papers hal-01065006, HAL.
    6. Heinemeyer, Hans Christian, 2006. "The impact of new borders on trade: World War I and the economic disintegration of Central Europe," Discussion Papers 2006/14, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    7. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/607 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    European trade patterns; break-up of the Austro-Hungarian Empire;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • N14 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: 1913-
    • N74 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Europe: 1913-
    • P59 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Other

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