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Too-International-to-Fail? Supranational Bank Resolution and Market Discipline

Author

Listed:
  • Lucyna Anna Gornicka

    (IMF - International Monetary Fund - Washington, District of Columbia (United States))

  • Marius Andrei Zoican

    (DRM - Dauphine Recherches en Management - Université Paris-Dauphine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

Supranational resolution of insolvent banks does not necessarily improve welfare. Supranational regulators are more inclined to bail-out banks indebted towards international creditors because they take into account cross-border contagion. When banks' creditors are more likely to be bailed out, market discipline decreases and risk-taking by indebted banks increases. Depending on the trade-off between giving the right incentives ex ante and limiting contagion ex post, both a national and a supranational resolution framework can be optimal. In particular, if market discipline is low under both national and supranational resolution mechanisms, supranational resolution improves welfare as it stimulates interbank trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Lucyna Anna Gornicka & Marius Andrei Zoican, 2016. "Too-International-to-Fail? Supranational Bank Resolution and Market Discipline," Post-Print hal-01253632, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01253632
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01253632
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Haritchabalet, Carole & Lepetit, Laetitia & Spinassou, Kévin & Strobel, Frank, 2017. "Bank capital regulation: Are local or central regulators better?," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 103-114.
    2. Buch, Claudia M. & Krause, Thomas & Tonzer, Lena, 2017. "Drivers of systemic risk: Do national and European perspectives differ?," Discussion Papers 09/2017, Deutsche Bundesbank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    moral hazard; contagion; bank regulation; market discipline;

    JEL classification:

    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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