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International Migration and Foreign Trade: What connexion? (In French)


  • Stéphane BECUWE (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113)
  • Fatma MABROUK (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113)


This paper establishes an inventory of international migration and trade relationship. In the new global context, this link is complex and multidimensional. It includes political, economic, social, and legal, it involves many actors like international organizations, migrants, countries of origin and host. Our methodology is based on Principal Component Analysis and a Hierarchical Ascendant Classification to show a clear link between migration and trade, where distance is the main discriminating variable. We used a gravity model in cross section to show the positive effect of trade on international migration. The signs obtained for the two variables (exports and imports) indicate clearly a complementary relationship between migration and trade. We note also that the degrees of significance of these two variables are close. This seems to confirm that it is important that the bilateral trade relations are that migration is important.

Suggested Citation

  • Stéphane BECUWE (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113) & Fatma MABROUK (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113), 2010. "International Migration and Foreign Trade: What connexion? (In French)," Cahiers du GREThA 2010-18, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
  • Handle: RePEc:grt:wpegrt:2010-18

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Vincent Frigant, 2002. "Geographical proximity and supplying relationships in modular production," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(4), pages 742-755, December.
    2. BOLESŁAW DOMAŃSKI & KRZYSZTOF GWOSDZ, 2009. "Toward a More Embedded Production System? Automotive Supply Networks and Localized Capabilities in Poland," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(3), pages 452-482.
    3. Timothy J. Sturgeon, 2002. "Modular production networks: a new American model of industrial organization," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(3), pages 451-496, June.
    4. Vincent Frigant, 2007. "Between Internationalisation and Proximity: the internationalisation process of automotive first tier suppliers," Post-Print hal-00257463, HAL.
    5. Philippe Moati & El Mouhoub Mouhoud, 2005. "Les nouvelles logiques de décomposition internationale des processus productifs," Revue d'économie politique, Dalloz, vol. 115(5), pages 573-589.
    6. Vincent Frigant, 2007. "L'impact de la production modulaire sur l'approfondissement de la Division Internationale des Processus Productifs (DIPP)," Revue d'économie politique, Dalloz, vol. 117(6), pages 937-961.
    7. Yannick Lung & Boleslaw Domanski, 2009. "The changing face of the European periphery in the automotive industry," Post-Print hal-00388014, HAL.
    8. Petr Pavlínek & Jan Ženka, 2011. "Upgrading in the automotive industry: firm-level evidence from Central Europe," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(3), pages 559-586, May.
    9. Vincent Frigant & Jean-Bernard Layan, 2009. "Modular production and the new division of labour within Europe: the perspective of French automotive parts suppliers," Post-Print hal-00381341, HAL.
    10. Thomas Klier & James Rubenstein, 2008. "Who Really Made Your Car? Restructuring and Geographic change in the Auto Industry," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wrmyc, November.
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    More about this item


    International Migration; Foreign Trade; Principal components analysis; gravity model;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models

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