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The curse of being landlocked: Institutions rather than trade

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  • Fabrizio Carmignani

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  • Fabrizio Carmignani, 2012. "The curse of being landlocked: Institutions rather than trade," Discussion Papers in Economics economics:201204, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:gri:epaper:economics:201204
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Chang, Pao-Li & Lee, Myoung-Jae, 2011. "The WTO trade effect," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 53-71, September.
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    5. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian & Francesco Trebbi, 2004. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions Over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 131-165, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Jetter & Saskia Mösle & David Stadelmann, 2017. "Landlockedness and Economic Development: Analyzing Subnational Panel Data and Exploring Mechanisms," CESifo Working Paper Series 6733, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Jerg Gutmann & Stefan Voigt, 2015. "The Rule of Law: Measurement and Deep Roots," CESifo Working Paper Series 5670, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Landlocked; income; trade; institutions; system of equations;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration

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