IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fth/wobadi/25.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Poor And The Poorest

Author

Listed:
  • LIPTON, M.

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Lipton, M., 1988. "The Poor And The Poorest," World Bank - Discussion Papers 25, World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:wobadi:25
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Nadeem A. Burney & Ashfaque H. Khan, 1991. "Household Consumption Patterns in Pakistan: An Urban-Rural Comparison Using Micro Data," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 145-171.
    2. Sansoucy, R. & Jabbar, Mohammad A. & Ehui, Simeon K. & Fitzhugh, H., 1995. "Keynote paper: The contribution of livestock to food security and sustainable development1," Research Reports 182946, International Livestock Research Institute.
    3. Oscar Altimir, 2001. "Long-term trends of poverty in Latin American countries," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 28(1 Year 20), pages 115-155, June.
    4. Julian May & Benjamin Roberts, 2005. "Poverty Diagnostics Using Poor Data: Strengthening the Evidence Base for Pro-Poor Policy Making in Lesotho," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 74(3), pages 477-510, December.
    5. Sullivan, Caroline, 2002. "Calculating a Water Poverty Index," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(7), pages 1195-1210, July.
    6. Shaffer, Paul, 2013. "Ten Years of “Q-Squared”: Implications for Understanding and Explaining Poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 269-285.
    7. Nanak Kakwani & Hyun H. Son, 2006. "New Global Poverty Counts," Working Papers 29, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    8. Bouis, Howarth E. & Novenario-Reese, Mary Jane G., 1997. "The determinants of demand for micronutrients," FCND discussion papers 32, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Caterina Ruggeri Laderchi & Ruhi Saith & Frances Stewart, 2003. "Does it Matter that we do not Agree on the Definition of Poverty? A Comparison of Four Approaches," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 243-274.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fth:wobadi:25. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Krichel). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/wrldbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.