IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fth/banita/290.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Where Do Migrants Go? Risk-Aversion, Mobility Costs and the Locational Choice of Migrants

Author

Listed:
  • Daveri, F
  • Faini, R

Abstract

As part of their efforts to pool individual risks, households consider spreading their members over a multiplicity of locations both within their country of origin and abroad. At the same time, the world has innumerable Chinatown and Little Italies : when people move they tend to bunch in the same location. Bunching would appear to be fundamentally at odds with the desire for risk diversification. In this paper we provide a framework to reconcile spatial bunching and spreading of migrants, combining risk-aversion and concavity of mobility costs at the household level.

Suggested Citation

  • Daveri, F & Faini, R, 1996. "Where Do Migrants Go? Risk-Aversion, Mobility Costs and the Locational Choice of Migrants," Papers 290, Banca Italia - Servizio di Studi.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:banita:290
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jennifer Hunt, 2000. "Why Do People Still Live in East Germany?," NBER Working Papers 7564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. A. Daniela Cristina, 2008. "What Sways the Decision to Migrate? An Empirical Analysis of the Argentinean Case," Revista de Economía y Estadística, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Instituto de Economía y Finanzas, vol. 0(1), pages 7-30, January.
    3. Michiel Van Leuvensteijn & Ashok Parikh, 2002. "How different are the determinants of population versus labour migration in Germany?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(11), pages 699-703.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    RISK AVERSION ; MIGRANTS ; ITALY;

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fth:banita:290. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Krichel). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/bdigvit.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.