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Can Tests Based on Option Hedging Errors Correctly Identify Volatility Risk Premia?


  • Nicole Branger


  • Christian Schlag



Tests for the existence and the sign of the volatility risk premium are often based on expected option hedging errors. When the hedge is performed under the ideal conditions of continuous trading and correct model specification, the sign of the premium is the same as the sign of the mean hedging error for a large class of stochastic volatility option pricing models. We show, however, that the problems of discrete trading and model mis-specification, which are necessarily present in an empirical study, may cause the standard test to yield unreliable results. In particular, ignoring a possible jump risk premium can lead to incorrect conclusions about the volatility risk premium. We also show that delta-gamma hedges do not increase the reliability of the test compared to simple delta hedges.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicole Branger & Christian Schlag, 2008. "Can Tests Based on Option Hedging Errors Correctly Identify Volatility Risk Premia?," Working Paper Series: Finance and Accounting 136, Department of Finance, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main.
  • Handle: RePEc:fra:franaf:136

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    Cited by:

    1. Duyvesteyn, Johan & de Zwart, Gerben, 2015. "Riding the swaption curve," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 57-75.
    2. Alfredo Ibáñez, 2008. "The cross-section of average delta-hedge option returns under stochastic volatility," Review of Derivatives Research, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 205-244, October.
    3. Schmeiser, H. & Wagner, J., 2011. "A joint valuation of premium payment and surrender options in participating life insurance contracts," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 580-596.

    More about this item


    Stochastic Volatility; Volatility Risk Premium; Discretization Error; Model Mis-Specification;

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing

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