IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fpr/fcnddp/95.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Attrition in the Kwazulu Natal income dynamics study, 1993-1998

Author

Listed:
  • Maluccio, John A.

Abstract

This paper examines attrition in the KwaZulu-Natal Income Dynamics Study (1993–1998) and assesses the extent of attrition bias for a specific empirical example. The analysis shows that 1993 first round nonresponse is largely unrelated to observable characteristics of the communities other than indicators of migration activity. Multivariate regressions are then used to describe the characteristics of the households attriting in 1998, revealing the importance of distinguishing between two types of attriting households, those that moved and those that apparently moved but left no trace. For example, increased household size reduced the probability of either type of attrition, whereas measures of higher quality of fieldwork in the 1993 survey only reduced the probability that a household left no trace. While observable differences between attritors and non-attritors indicate attrition is nonrandom, it does not necessarily follow that estimated relationships based on the non-attriting sample suffer from attrition bias. To more directly explore attrition bias, which is by its nature model specific, this analysis estimates household-level expenditure functions correcting for attrition bias using standard Heckman selection procedures and a quality of 1993 interview variablesas identifying instruments. There is positive selection, and although many of the other parameter estimates are quite similar, a Hausman test rejects the equality of coefficients between the corrected and uncorrected models. Therefore, this study concludes, at least for this simple case, that attrition does appear to bias the “behavioral” coefficients.

Suggested Citation

  • Maluccio, John A., 2000. "Attrition in the Kwazulu Natal income dynamics study, 1993-1998," FCND discussion papers 95, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:fcnddp:95
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/fcndp95.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Nic Baigrie & Katherine Eyal, 2014. "An Evaluation of the Determinants and Implications of Panel Attrition in the National Income Dynamics Survey (2008-2010)," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 82(1), pages 39-65, March.
    2. Taryn Dinkelman, 2004. "How Household Context Affects Search Outcomes Of The Unemployed In Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 72(3), pages 484-521, September.
    3. M. Angeles Balsells & Crescencia Pastor & Pere Amorós & Ainoa Mateos & Carmen Ponce & Alicia Navajas, 2014. "Child Welfare and Successful Reunification through the Socio-Educative Process: Training Needs among Biological Families in Spain," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(4), pages 1-18, October.
    4. repec:dau:papers:123456789/5443 is not listed on IDEAS

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fpr:fcnddp:95. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ifprius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.