IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Fiscal policy in monetary unions: implications for Europe

  • Reuven Glick
  • Michael Hutchison

This paper analyzes how the feasible mix of government expenditure and financing arrangements may change with the establishment of a monetary union such as that planned by members of the European Community. We find that a monetary union reduces the feasible divergence across countries in their present discounted levels of fiscal spending. Wide differences across countries in their present and future time pattern of spending are still possible, however. Examination of the empirical evidence suggests that the movement towards greater exchange rate fixity associated with the EMS and participation in "quasi" monetary unions have not been accompanied by significant fiscal convergence. The experience of member states of several existing monetary unions, however, suggests that a more effective constraint to budgetary discipline arises within full-fledged unions in operation over long periods even in the absence of binding central rules on government deficit and debt positions.

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco in its series Working Papers in Applied Economic Theory with number 92-02.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 1992
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfap:92-02
Contact details of provider: Postal: P.O. Box 7702, San Francisco, CA 94120-7702
Phone: (415) 974-2000
Fax: (415) 974-3333
Web page: http://www.frbsf.org/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

Order Information: Email:


References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Feenstra, Robert C., 1986. "Functional equivalence between liquidity costs and the utility of money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 271-291, March.
  2. Jeremy Greenwood & Kent P. Kimbrough, 1985. "Capital Controls and Fiscal Policy in the World Economy," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 18(4), pages 743-65, November.
  3. Keuzenkamp, H.A. & Van Der Ploeg, F., 1990. "Saving, Investment, Government Finance And The Current Account: The Dutch Experience," Papers 9049, Tilburg - Center for Economic Research.
  4. Djajic, Slobodan, 1987. "Effects of budgetary policies in open economies: The role of intertemporal consumption substitution," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 373-383, September.
  5. A. Lans Bovenberg & Jeroen J. M. Kremers & Paul R. Masson, 1991. "Economic and Monetary Union in Europe and Constraints on National Budgetary Policies," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 38(2), pages 374-398, June.
  6. Anne C. Case & James R. Hines, Jr. & Harvey S. Rosen, 1989. "Copycatting: Fiscal Policies of States and Their Neighbors," NBER Working Papers 3032, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. repec:fth:harver:1437 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Donato Masciandaro & Guido Tabellini, 1987. "Monetary regimes and fiscal deficits: a comparative analysis," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 125-152.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedfap:92-02. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Diane Rosenberger)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.