IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/fedfap/92-02.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Fiscal policy in monetary unions: implications for Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Reuven Glick
  • Michael M. Hutchison

Abstract

This paper analyzes how the feasible mix of government expenditure and financing arrangements may change with the establishment of a monetary union such as that planned by members of the European Community. We find that a monetary union reduces the feasible divergence across countries in their present discounted levels of fiscal spending. Wide differences across countries in their present and future time pattern of spending are still possible, however. Examination of the empirical evidence suggests that the movement towards greater exchange rate fixity associated with the EMS and participation in \"quasi\" monetary unions have not been accompanied by significant fiscal convergence. The experience of member states of several existing monetary unions, however, suggests that a more effective constraint to budgetary discipline arises within full-fledged unions in operation over long periods even in the absence of binding central rules on government deficit and debt positions.

Suggested Citation

  • Reuven Glick & Michael M. Hutchison, 1992. "Fiscal policy in monetary unions: implications for Europe," Working Papers in Applied Economic Theory 92-02, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfap:92-02
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gary S. Becker & Nigel Tomes, 1994. "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," NBER Chapters, in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education, Third Edition, pages 257-298, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Anne C. Case & James R. Hines, Jr. & Harvey S. Rosen, 1989. "Copycatting: Fiscal Policies of States and Their Neighbors," NBER Working Papers 3032, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Keuzenkamp, H.A. & van der Ploeg, F., 1990. "Saving, investment, government finance and the current account : The Dutch experience," Other publications TiSEM 088ed37d-ab12-47e2-92ed-3, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    4. Feenstra, Robert C., 1986. "Functional equivalence between liquidity costs and the utility of money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 271-291, March.
    5. repec:fth:harver:1437 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Donato Masciandaro & Guido Tabellini, 1987. "Monetary regimes and fiscal deficits: a comparative analysis," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 125-152.
    7. A. Lans Bovenberg & Jeroen J. M. Kremers & Paul R. Masson, 1991. "Economic and Monetary Union in Europe and Constraints on National Budgetary Policies," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 38(2), pages 374-398, June.
    8. Djajic, Slobodan, 1987. "Effects of budgetary policies in open economies: The role of intertemporal consumption substitution," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 373-383, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Thierry Warin, 2004. "Should Europe Get Rid of the Stability and Growth Pact?," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0415, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
    2. Kocenda, Evzen & Kutan, Ali M. & Yigit, Taner M., 2008. "Fiscal convergence in the European Union," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 319-330, December.
    3. repec:kap:iaecre:v:11:y:2005:i:1:p:29-38 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Joseph Daniels & David VanHoose, 1998. "Two-Country Models of Monetary and Fiscal Policy: What Have We Learned? What More Can We Learn?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 265-284, July.
    5. Phebby Kufa & Saqib Rizavi & Mr. Anthony J. Pellechio, 2003. "Fiscal Sustainability and Policy Issues in the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union," IMF Working Papers 2003/162, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 2016. "International Coordination," NBER Working Papers 21878, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Maurice Obstfeld, 1997. "Europe's Gamble," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 28(2), pages 241-317.
    8. Alesina, Alberto Francesco, 1997. "Comments on 'Europe's Gamble' by M. Obstfeld," Scholarly Articles 12553725, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    9. Paweł Młodkowski, 2006. "Konwergencja fiskalna w uniach walutowych w Afryce na tle rozwiązań europejskich," Gospodarka Narodowa. The Polish Journal of Economics, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 1-2, pages 19-36.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. de Groof, R.J. & van Tuijl, M.A., 1992. "Commercial integration and fiscal policy in interdependent, financially integrated two-sector economies with real and nominal wage rigidity," Research Memorandum FEW 567, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    2. Reuven Glick & Michael M. Hutchison, 1990. "Economic integration and fiscal policy transmission: implications for Europe in 1992 and beyond," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Spr, pages 17-28.
    3. de Groof, R.J. & van Tuijl, M.A., 1992. "Commercial integration and fiscal policy in interdependent, financially integrated two-sector economies with real and nominal wage rigidity," Other publications TiSEM 892948a8-83fa-42c0-96bf-b, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    4. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Lance Lochner & Youngmin Park, 2017. "Correlation, Consumption, Confusion, or Constraints: Why Do Poor Children Perform so Poorly?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 119(1), pages 102-147, January.
    5. Hermann, Zoltán, 2005. "A helyi munkaerőpiac hatása a középfokú továbbtanulási döntésekre [The local labour markets effect on decisions to enter secondary-level education]," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(1), pages 39-60.
    6. Grossmann, Volker, 2008. "Risky human capital investment, income distribution, and macroeconomic dynamics," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 19-42, March.
    7. John C. Bluedorn & Elizabeth U. Cascio, 2005. "Education and Intergenerational Mobility: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Purerto Rico," Economics Papers 2005-W21, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    8. Emran, M. & Ferreira, Francisco & Jiang, Yajing & Sun, Yan, 2020. "Occupational Dualism and Intergenerational Educational Mobility in the Rural Economy: Evidence from China and India," MPRA Paper 101559, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2020. "Cultural Transmission, Education-Promoting Attitudes, and Economic Development," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 37, pages 173-194, July.
    10. Noël Bonneuil* & Romina Boarini, 2004. "Preserving Transfer Benefit For Present And Future Generations," Mathematical Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3-4), pages 181-203.
    11. William S. Schulze & Michael H. Lubatkin & Richard N. Dino, 2002. "Altruism, agency, and the competitiveness of family firms," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(4-5), pages 247-259.
    12. Sellin, Peter, 1998. "Monetary Policy and the Stock Market: Theory and Empirical Evidence," Working Paper Series 72, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    13. Mikael Lindahl & Mårten Palme & Sofia Sandgren-Massih & Anna Sjögren, 2014. "A Test of the Becker-Tomes Model of Human Capital Transmission Using Microdata on Four Generations," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages 80-96.
    14. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Schluter, Christian, 2002. "The Effect of Family Income During Childhood on Later-Life Attainment: Evidence from Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 604, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Dirk Niepelt, 2020. "Monetary Policy with Reserves and CBDC: Optimality, Equivalence, and Politics," Working Papers 20.05, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.
    16. Kartik B. Athreya & Jessica Sackett Romero, 2015. "Land of Opportunity: Economic Mobility in the United States," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue 2Q, pages 169-191.
    17. Erik Plug & Wim Vijverberg, 2003. "Schooling, Family Background, and Adoption: Is It Nature or Is It Nurture?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(3), pages 611-641, June.
    18. J. Michael Collins & Elizabeth Odders-White, 2021. "Allowances: Incidence in the US and Relationship to Financial Capability in Young Adulthood," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 533-544, September.
    19. Néstor Gandelman, 2015. "A Comparison of Saving Rates: Micro Evidence from Seventeen Latin American and Caribbean Countries," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 90556, Inter-American Development Bank.
    20. Honggao Cao, 2005. "Time and Financial Transfers Within and Beyond the Family: Results From the Health and Retirement Study," Labor and Demography 0502006, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedfap:92-02. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbsfus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbsfus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.