IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fem/femwpa/2011.15.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

How CO2 Capture and Storage Can Mitigate Carbon Leakage

Author

Listed:
  • Philippe Quirion

    (Centre international de recherche sur l’environnement et le développement (CIRED))

  • Julie Rozenberg

    (Centre international de recherche sur l’environnement et le développement (CIRED))

  • Olivier Sassi

    (Centre international de recherche sur l’environnement et le développement (CIRED))

  • Adrien Vogt-Schilb

    (Centre international de recherche sur l’environnement et le développement (CIRED))

Abstract

Most CO2 abatement policies reduce the demand for fossil fuels and therefore their price in international markets. If these policies are not global, this price decrease raises emissions in countries without CO2 abatement policies, generating “carbon leakage”. On the other hand, if the countries which abate CO2 emissions are net fossil fuel importers, they benefit from this price decrease, which reduces the abatement cost. In contrast, CO2 capture and storage (CCS) does not reduce fossil fuel demand, therefore it generates neither this type of leakage nor this negative feedback on abatement costs. We quantify these effects with the global hybrid general equilibrium model Imaclim-R and show that they are quantitatively important. Indeed, for a given unilateral abatement in OECD countries, leakage is more than halved in a scenario with CCS included among the abatement options, compared to a scenario prohibiting CCS. We show that the main reason for this difference in leakage is the above-mentioned international fossil fuel price feedback. This article does not intend to assess the desirability of CCS, which has many other pros and cons. It just identifies a consequence of CCS that should be taken into account, together with many others, when deciding to what extent CCS should be developed.

Suggested Citation

  • Philippe Quirion & Julie Rozenberg & Olivier Sassi & Adrien Vogt-Schilb, 2011. "How CO2 Capture and Storage Can Mitigate Carbon Leakage," Working Papers 2011.15, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2011.15
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.feem.it/userfiles/attach/20112101158254NDL2011-015.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. DURAND-LASSERVE, Olivier & Pierru , Axel & SMEERS, Yves, 2012. "Sensitivity of policy simulation to benchmark scenarios in CGE models: illustration with carbon leakage," CORE Discussion Papers 2012063, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    CO2 Capture and Storage; Carbon Leakage;

    JEL classification:

    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2011.15. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (barbara racah). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/feemmit.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.