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Economic Valuation of On Site Material Damages of High Water on Economic Activities based in the City of Venice: Results from a Dose-Response-Expert-Based Valuation Approach


  • Paulo A.L.D. Nunes

    (University of Venice, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei and Free University)

  • Margaretha Breil

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei)

  • Gretel Gambarelli

    (University of Venice, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei)


The paper focuses on the economic assessment of damages caused by high water in the city of Venice. In particular, we focus our attention on a valuation exercise that addresses the estimation of monetary, short period, on-site damages due to high water events on the different business activities located in Venice. On-site damages include both mitigation costs, which refer to all types of financial expenditure undergone to avert physical and material damages caused by flooding, and remediation costs, i.e. costs to be sustained for maintenance and substitution of affected building elements. Hence, the present study can be considered as a pioneering attempt to analytically quantify, from an economic point of view, on-site damages from high water. An integrated dose-response modelling and an expert-based valuation approach have been selected as the most suitable economic valuation methodology to shed light on the on-site damages. The main focus of the work is to assess dose-response relationships, which are able to describe the physical effects of high water on the different on-site damage categories, including inner and front doors maintenance, cleaning of pavements and maintenance of the walls. Bearing in mind such an economic valuation framework, we proceed with the estimation of on-site damages not only for the present high water situation (business as usual) but also extend the valuation exercise to three additional high water scenarios: (1) a climate change scenario; (2) a high water protection scenario; and, (3) a combined climate change and protection scenario. Estimation results show that the welfare loss due to on-site, short-term damages supported by the business activities ranges from 3.41 to 4.73 million Euro per year, respectively for the business as usual and climate change scenarios. Finally, we can conclude that the introduction of a public policy protection mechanism that defends the city of Venice from any flooding above 110 cm above the Punta della Salute Tidal Datum, such as the MOSE, will reduce the on-site damages supported by the business activities up to 2.87 million Euro per year.

Suggested Citation

  • Paulo A.L.D. Nunes & Margaretha Breil & Gretel Gambarelli, 2005. "Economic Valuation of On Site Material Damages of High Water on Economic Activities based in the City of Venice: Results from a Dose-Response-Expert-Based Valuation Approach," Working Papers 2005.53, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2005.53

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alessandra Goria & Gretel Gambarelli, 2004. "Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation in Italy," Working Papers 2004.103, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Bigano & Francesco Bosello & Roberto Roson & Richard Tol, 2008. "Economy-wide impacts of climate change: a joint analysis for sea level rise and tourism," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 13(8), pages 765-791, October.
    2. Fontini, Fulvio & Umgiesser, Georg & Vergano, Lucia, 2010. "The role of ambiguity in the evaluation of the net benefits of the MOSE system in the Venice lagoon," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(10), pages 1964-1972, August.
    3. Lucia Vergano & Georg Umgiesser & Paulo A.L.D. Nunes, 2010. "An Economic Assessment of the Impacts of the MOSE Barriers on Venice Port Activities," Working Papers 2010.17, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    4. Stasinopoulos, Georgios, 2009. "Economic impacts of climate change on cities: A survey of the existing literature," HWWI Policy Papers 1-18, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    5. Francesco Bosello & Robert Nicholls & Julie Richards & Roberto Roson & Richard Tol, 2012. "Economic impacts of climate change in Europe: sea-level rise," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 112(1), pages 63-81, May.
    6. Stefanos Xenarios & Kostas Bithas, 2009. "Welfare Improvisation from the Receiving Waters of Urban Wastewater Systems in the Context of the Water Framework Directive," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 23(5), pages 981-1000, March.
    7. Alistair Hunt & Paul Watkiss, 2011. "Climate change impacts and adaptation in cities: a review of the literature," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 104(1), pages 13-49, January.
    8. Jonathan Pycroft & Jan Abrell & Juan-Carlos Ciscar, 2016. "The Global Impacts of Extreme Sea-Level Rise: A Comprehensive Economic Assessment," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 64(2), pages 225-253, June.

    More about this item


    High water damages; Venice; Economic valuation;

    JEL classification:

    • C29 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Other
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

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