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Advertising to boost energy efficiency: the Power of One campaign and natural gas consumption

  • Diffney, Sean

    (ESRI)

  • Lyons, Sean

    (ESRI)

  • Malguzzi Valeri, Laura

    (ESRI)

In this paper we study the recent awareness and persuasion campaign launched by the Irish government to increase energy efficiency and we assess its effect on residential natural gas consumption. We first analyse changes in the daily consumption of natural gas and find that advertising leaflets had a significant effect on natural gas consumption. We then study three surveys administered to 1000 consumers prior to and during the campaign. This repeated cross-section allows us to determine that the efficiency campaign has increased self-reported interest in energy efficiency and awareness of behaviours that curb natural gas consumption. However we do not find any positive effect of the campaign on self-reported energy-saving behaviours.

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Paper provided by Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) in its series Papers with number WP280.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:esr:wpaper:wp280
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  13. Scott, Susan & Lyons, Sean & Keane, Claire & McCarthy, Donal & Tol, Richard S. J., 2008. "Fuel Poverty in Ireland: Extent, Affected Groups and Policy Issues," Papers WP262, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
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  16. Woods, James, 2008. "What people do when they say they are conserving electricity," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 1945-1956, June.
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