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Disability benefits and paying for care

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  • Berthoud, Richard
  • Hancock, Ruth

Abstract

Attendance Allowance and the care component of Disability Living Allowance are paid to nearly four million elderly or disabled people who need to help in their daily lives. In the course of recent debate about financing the growing demand for social care services, the Wanless report (2006) suggested that these disability benefits paid by the social security system should be curtailed, releasing resources that could used by social workers to pay directly for care. This paper uses some new findings about the needs and resources of disabled claimants to comment on that proposal. It considers six issues of principle about the balance between cash and care in the delivery of support to disabled people. A decision to change policy would need to take account of the costs to the losers, as well as of the benefits to the gainers.

Suggested Citation

  • Berthoud, Richard & Hancock, Ruth, 2008. "Disability benefits and paying for care," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-40, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2008-40
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2008-40.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Ruth Hancock & Marcello Morciano & Stephen Pudney & Francesca Zantomio, 2015. "Do household surveys give a coherent view of disability benefit targeting?: a multisurvey latent variable analysis for the older population in Great Britain," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 178(4), pages 815-836, October.
    2. Zantomio, Francesca, 2013. "Older people's participation in extra-cost disability benefits," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 320-330.

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