IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Carbon Footprint Labeling Activities in the East Asia Summit Region: Spillover Effects to Less Developed Countries


  • Xunpeng SHI

    (Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA))


Abstract: This paper discusses carbon footprint (CFP) labeling activities in the East Asia Summit (EAS) region with a focus on their spillover effects on less developed countries (LDCs). Due to increased and increasing economic integration, implementation of CFP labeling schemes in one country will have significant impact on others. The impact is particularly significant for LDCs in the EAS region because: the EAS production networks are highly integrated, which provide necessary condition for the spill-over effects to be generated; LDCs generally lack the capacity to measure and label CFP of their products; and exports from LDCs often produced by relatively small producers. However, the effective inclusion of LDCs in labeling schemes may offer more and cost-effective opportunities for carbon emission reductions. The presence of spillover effects means that countries that are implementing carbon labeling schemes need to take stakeholders outside of their boundaries into consideration. The disadvantages of LDCs can be reduced by well designed carbon labeling schemes, by innovative solutions to low cost data collection and certification, and by technical transfer, training and capacity building.

Suggested Citation

  • Xunpeng SHI, 2010. "Carbon Footprint Labeling Activities in the East Asia Summit Region: Spillover Effects to Less Developed Countries," Working Papers DP-2010-06, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA).
  • Handle: RePEc:era:wpaper:dp-2010-06

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rajah Rasiah & Jebamalai Vinanchiarachi, 2013. "Institutional Support and Technological Upgrading: Evidence from Dynamic Clusters in Latin America and Asia," World Economic Review, World Economics Association, vol. 2013(2), pages 1-24, February.
    2. Malerba, Franco, 2007. "Innovation and the dynamics and evolution of industries: Progress and challenges," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 675-699, August.
    3. Nelson, Richard R, 2001. "Observations on the Post-Bayh-Dole Rise of Patenting at American Universities," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 26(1-2), pages 13-19, January.
    4. North, Douglass C, 1994. "Economic Performance through Time," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 359-368, June.
    5. Ha-Joon Chang, 2001. "Intellectual Property Rights and Economic Development: Historical lessons and emerging issues," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2), pages 287-309.
    6. Mazzoleni, Roberto & Nelson, Richard R., 1998. "The benefits and costs of strong patent protection: a contribution to the current debate," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 273-284, July.
    7. Dani Rodrik, 1994. "Getting Interventions Right: How South Korea and Taiwan Grew Rich," NBER Working Papers 4964, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. World Bank, 2012. "World Development Indicators 2012," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6014.
    9. Corden, W Max & Neary, J Peter, 1982. "Booming Sector and De-Industrialisation in a Small Open Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(368), pages 825-848, December.
    10. Moses Abramovitz, 1956. "Resource and Output Trends in the United States Since 1870," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number abra56-1, January.
    11. Rajah Rasiah, 2009. "Institutions and Public-Private Partnerships: Learning and Innovation in Electronics Firms in Penang, Johor and Batam-Karawang," Institutions and Economies (formerly known as International Journal of Institutions and Economies), Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, vol. 1(2), pages 206-233, October.
    12. Moses Abramovitz, 1956. "Resource and Output Trends in the United States Since 1870," NBER Chapters,in: Resource and Output Trends in the United States Since 1870, pages 1-23 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Shahid Yusuf & Kaoru Nabeshima, 2009. "Tiger Economies Under Threat : A Comparative Analysis of Malaysia's Industrial Prospects and Policy Options," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2680.
    14. Nelson, Richard R., 2008. "What enables rapid economic progress: What are the needed institutions," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 1-11, February.
    15. Best, Michael, 2001. "The New Competitive Advantage: The Renewal of American Industry," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198297451, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Xunpeng SHI & Shinichi GOTO, 2011. "Harmonizing Biodiesel Fuel Standards in East Asia: Current Status, Challenges and Way Forward," Working Papers DP-2011-03, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA).
    2. Nabeshima, Kaoru, 2011. "Growth strategies in a greener world," IDE Discussion Papers 314, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    3. Hamish van der Ven & Steven Bernstein & Matthew Hoffmann, 2017. "Valuing the Contributions of Nonstate and Subnational Actors to Climate Governance," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 17(1), pages 1-20, February.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:era:wpaper:dp-2010-06. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Hiroshi Okasaki). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.