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The evolving supply and demand of skills in the labour market


  • Maselli, Ilaria


This paper analyses labour demand and supply with respect to skills and tasks. The literature on this topic is abundant, especially in light of education expansion and the impact of technology on labour demand. The goal of this work is not to add evidence to the causes and effects of labour demand and supply but rather to sketch the broader picture of their equilibrium and then to try to anticipate what type of skills mismatch EU countries will encounter during the next decade. The paper begins with separate considerations of labour demand and supply with respect to qualifi cation, outlining the main trends and their causes. This is followed by an analysis of their equilibrium and a matrix which can be used to understand the potential types of mismatches. Finally, conclusions and avenues for future research are drawn.

Suggested Citation

  • Maselli, Ilaria, 2012. "The evolving supply and demand of skills in the labour market," CEPS Papers 7911, Centre for European Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:eps:cepswp:7911

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. James D. Hamilton & Jing Cynthia Wu, 2012. "The Effectiveness of Alternative Monetary Policy Tools in a Zero Lower Bound Environment," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44, pages 3-46, February.
    2. Krugman, Paul, 1988. "Financing vs. forgiving a debt overhang," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 253-268, November.
    3. Joseph E. Gagnon & Matthew Raskin & Julie Remache & Brian P. Sack, 2011. "Large-scale asset purchases by the Federal Reserve: did they work?," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue May, pages 41-59.
    4. Joyce, Michael & Lasaosa, Ana & Stevens , Ibrahim & Tong, Matthew, 2010. "The financial market impact of quantitative easing," Bank of England working papers 393, Bank of England.
    5. Kopf, Christian, 2011. "Restoring financial stability in the euro area," CEPS Papers 4292, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    6. N. Nergiz Dincer & Barry Eichengreen, 2007. "Central Bank Transparency: Where, Why, and with What Effects?," NBER Working Papers 13003, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gilberto Antonelli & Sara Binassi & Giovanni Guidetti & Giulio Pedrini, 2016. "Assessing selection patterns and wage differential of high-skilled migrants. Evidence from the AlmaLaurea dataset on Italian graduates working abroad," Working Papers 76, AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium.
    2. Gunther Tichy, 2016. "Is the Working Society Running Out of Jobs?," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 89(12), pages 853-871, December.
    3. Maselli,Ilaria & Fabo, Brian, 2015. "Digital workers by design? An example from the on-demand economy," CEPS Papers 11030, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    4. International Labour Office., 2015. "Global employment trends for youth 2015 : scaling up investments in decent jobs for youth," Global Employment Trends Reports 994891803402676, International Labour Office, Economic and Labour Market Analysis Department.
    5. Andreea Mirica, 2014. "Higher Education – A Solution To Unemployment? Case Study: Romania," Romanian Statistical Review, Romanian Statistical Review, vol. 62(3), pages 63-75, September.
    6. Kureková, Lucia Mýtna & Žilin?íková, Zuzana, 2015. "Low-Skilled Jobs and Student Jobs: Employers' Preferences in Slovakia and the Czech Republic," IZA Discussion Papers 9145, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Lucia Mýtna Kureková & Zuzana Žilinčíková, 2016. "Are student jobs flexible jobs? Using online data to study employers’ preferences in Slovakia," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-14, December.

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