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Do Spouses Cooperate? And If Not: Why?

  • Cochard François
  • Couprie Helene
  • Hopfensitz Astrid


    (CRESE, Université de Franche-Comté.
    THEMA, Université de Cergy Pontoise.
    GREMAQ, Toulouse School of Economics)

Models of household economics require an understanding of economic interactions in families. Social ties, repetition and reduced strategic uncertainty make social dilemmas in couples a very special case that needs to be empirically studied. In this paper we present results from a large economic experiment with 100 maritally living couples. Participants made decisions in a social dilemma with their partner and with a stranger. We predict behavior in this task with individual and couples' socio-demographic variables, efficiency preferences and couples' marital satisfaction. As opposed to models explaining behavior amongst strangers, the regressions on couples’ decisions highlight clear patterns concerning cooperation behavior which could inspire future household decision-making models.

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Paper provided by THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise in its series THEMA Working Papers with number 2009-10.

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Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ema:worpap:2009-10
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