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Are the Disabled Discriminated Against in Product Markets? Evidence from Sportscards to Sportscars

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Listed:
  • John A. List
  • Uri Gneezy

Abstract

Social scientists have presented evidence that suggests discrimination is ubiquitous—across several heterogeneous labor markets, as well as product markets as diverse as home insurance and new car sales, women, nonwhites, and the elderly have been found to be the target of discriminatory behavior. Yet one important issue that has been largely ignored is whether the disabled are discriminated against in the marketplace. This study experimentally examines whether the disabled are discriminated against in two distinct product markets: the sportscard market and the sportscar market. In the sportscard market we direct agents to enter the marketplace and attempt to sell a sportscard; we measure differential treatment by comparing initial and final offers received across the disabled and abled agents. In the latter market we direct agents to visit bodyshops to obtain an estimate to fix their car. Again, measured discrimination relates to the price dimension. Combining these data with complementary field experiments provides interesting insights into both the nature and extent of discrimination observed in these markets.

Suggested Citation

  • John A. List & Uri Gneezy, 2004. "Are the Disabled Discriminated Against in Product Markets? Evidence from Sportscards to Sportscars," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 651, Econometric Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecm:nasm04:651
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    Cited by:

    1. Rich, Judy, 2014. "What Do Field Experiments of Discrimination in Markets Tell Us? A Meta Analysis of Studies Conducted since 2000," IZA Discussion Papers 8584, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Caitlin Knowles Myers & Marcus Bellows & Hiba Fakhoury & Douglas Hale & Alexander Hall & Kaitlin Ofman, 2010. "Ladies first? A field study of discrimination in coffee shops," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(14), pages 1761-1769.
    3. David Neumark, 2012. "Detecting Discrimination in Audit and Correspondence Studies," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(4), pages 1128-1157.
    4. Castillo, Marco & Petrie, Ragan, 2010. "Discrimination in the lab: Does information trump appearance?," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 50-59, January.
    5. Klinner, Nicole S. & Walsh, Gianfranco, 2013. "Customer perceptions of discrimination in service deliveries: Construction and validation of a measurement instrument," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(5), pages 651-658.

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