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Tackling Climate Change At Home: Trends and Challenges in Enhancing Energy Efficiency in Buildings

Author

Listed:
  • Paola Deda

    () (United Nations Economic Commission for Europe)

  • George Georgiadis

    () (United Nations Economic Commission for Europe)

Abstract

A significant percentage of greenhouse gas emissions results from the need to heat and cool buildings and to provide power to household appliances. The potential for energy savings in this sector is considerable with estimates that energy use could be cut by almost a third simply by implementing currently cost-effective measures. The gains are particularly large in the former transition economies of eastern Europe, as energy costs there used to be subsidized and the inefficiencies inherent in central planning led to a poorly designed housing stock. In addition, in a number of these economies, even buildings currently being constructed are inadequately designed for energy efficiency. The benefits of increasing efficiency do not just translate into social objectives such as reducing carbon emissions but accrue directly to households by lowering their energy bills. Housing policy also has an indirect impact on emissions by affecting land-use decisions which can lead to deforestation and increased transport. Often there are major losses in just getting the energy from the power plants to the buildings.

Suggested Citation

  • Paola Deda & George Georgiadis, 2009. "Tackling Climate Change At Home: Trends and Challenges in Enhancing Energy Efficiency in Buildings," UNECE Annual Report Economic Essays 2009_5, UNECE.
  • Handle: RePEc:ece:annrep:2009_5
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    File URL: http://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/oes/nutshell/2009/5_ClimateChangeatHome.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2009
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; global warming; energy efficiency; housing;

    JEL classification:

    • P25 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Urban, Rural, and Regional Economics
    • P28 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Natural Resources; Environment
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General
    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy
    • R52 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Land Use and Other Regulations

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