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The Dodd-Frank Act and Basel III : Intentions, Unintended Consequences, and Lessons for Emerging Markets

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  • Viral V. Acharya

    (Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI))

Abstract

This paper is an attempt to explain the changes to finance sector reforms under the Dodd-Frank Act in the United States and Basel III requirements globally; their unintended consequences; and lessons for currently fast-growing emerging markets concerning finance sector reforms, government involvement in the finance sector, possible macroprudential safeguards against spillover risks from the global economy, and, finally, management of government debt and fiscal conditions. The paper starts with a summary of reforms under the Dodd-Frank Act and highlights four of its primary shortcomings. It then focuses on the new capital and liquidity requirements under Basel III reforms, arguing that, like its predecessors, Basel III is fundamentally flawed as a way of designing macroprudential regulation of the finance sector. In contrast, the Dodd-Frank Act has several redeeming features, including requirements of stress-test-based macroprudential regulation and explicit investigation of systemic risk in designating some financial firms as systemically important. It argues that India should resist the call for blind adherence to Basel III and persist with its (Reserve Bank of India) asset-level leverage restrictions and dynamic sector risk-weight adjustment approach. It concludes with some important lessons for regulation of the finance sector in emerging markets based on the global financial crisis and proposed reforms that have followed in the aftermath.

Suggested Citation

  • Viral V. Acharya, 2012. "The Dodd-Frank Act and Basel III : Intentions, Unintended Consequences, and Lessons for Emerging Markets," Governance Working Papers 23352, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:govern:23352
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Viral V. Acharya & Lasse H. Pedersen & Thomas Philippon & Matthew Richardson, 2017. "Measuring Systemic Risk," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 30(1), pages 2-47.
    2. Acharya, Viral V. & Schnabl, Philipp & Suarez, Gustavo, 2013. "Securitization without risk transfer," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(3), pages 515-536.
    3. Viral Acharya & Itamar Drechsler & Philipp Schnabl, 2014. "A Pyrrhic Victory? Bank Bailouts and Sovereign Credit Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(6), pages 2689-2739, December.
    4. Viral V. Acharya & Matthew Richardson & Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh & Lawrence J. White, 2011. "Guaranteed to Fail: Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Debacle of Mortgage Finance," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 9400.
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    Cited by:

    1. Morgan, Peter J. & Pontines, Victor, 2013. "An Asian Perspective on Global Financial Reforms," ADBI Working Papers 433, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    2. Godechot, Olivier & Neumann, Nils & Apascaritei, Paula & Boza, István & Hällsten, Martin & Henriksen, Lasse Folke & Hermansen, Are & Hou, Feng & Jung, Jiwook & Kodama, Naomi & Křížková, Alena & Lippén, 2021. "Ups and downs in finance, ups without downs in inequality," MaxPo Discussion Paper Series 21/2, Max Planck Sciences Po Center on Coping with Instability in Market Societies (MaxPo).
    3. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "Size, efficiency, market power, and economies of scale in the African banking sector," Financial Innovation, Springer;Southwestern University of Finance and Economics, vol. 5(1), pages 1-22, December.
    4. Wall, Larry, 2014. "Measuring capital adequacy: supervisory stress-tests in a Basel world," Journal of Financial Perspectives, EY Global FS Institute, vol. 2(1), pages 85-94.
    5. Fariborz Moshirian, 2014. "Implications of global financial and regulatory policies on systemic risk in Asia," Chapters, in: Iwan J. Azis & Hyun S. Shin (ed.), Global Shock, Risks, and Asian Financial Reform, chapter 8, pages 284-332, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Li, Yi, 2021. "Reciprocal lending relationships in shadow banking," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 141(2), pages 600-619.
    7. Patricia Palhau Mora & Michael Januska, 2016. "On the Nexus of Monetary Policy and Financial Stability: Is the Financial System More Resilient?," Discussion Papers 16-12, Bank of Canada.
    8. -, 2019. "Economic Survey of Latin America and the Caribbean 2019. The new global financial context: effects and transmission mechanisms in the region," Estudio Económico de América Latina y el Caribe, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 44675 edited by Eclac, December.
    9. Dawa Sherpa, 2013. "Critical Evaluation of Basel III as Prudential Regulation and its Consequences in Developing Countries’ Credit Needs," EY International Congress on Economics I (EYC2013), October 24-25, 2013, Ankara, Turkey 253, Ekonomik Yaklasim Association.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    The Dodd-Frank Act; Basel III; Emerging Markets; spillover risks; Macroprudential regulation; global financial crisis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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