IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/eab/financ/22239.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Impact Of Proposed Commodity Transaction Tax On Futures Trading In India

Author

Listed:
  • Pravakar Sahoo

    (Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations)

  • Rajiv Kumar

Abstract

Trading in commodity derivatives on exchange platforms is an instrument to achieve price discovery, better price risk management, besides helping macro-economy with better resource allocation. Since the inception (2003) of national online trading on multi-commodity exchange platforms, the trade volumes have grown exponentially. In the union budget 2008-09, the government has proposed to impose a commodity transaction tax (CTT) of 0.017%. Though the stated rationale for imposing higher taxes is to contain price rise and volatility, to generate revenue, and to increase transparency, these arguments are debatable and not much rooted in the available literature. In this context, we examine the relationship between trading activity, volatility and transaction cost using a three-equation structural model for five top selected commodities namely Gold, Copper, Petroleum Crude, Soya Oil and Chana (Chickpea). Results suggest that there exists a negative relationship between transaction cost and liquidity, and a positive relationship between transaction cost and volatility. Therefore, if the government imposes CTT, it would lead to higher volatility and lower trading activity affecting market efficiency and liquidity.However, agricultural commodities such as refined Soya oil and Chana are least affected in terms of volume and volatility in response to the imposition of transaction tax. Increased volatility may lead to more speculative activity and fail to achieve the price discovery and resource allocation objectives of the commodity markets. Further, the granger causality results reveal the efficiency of futures markets but do not provide any conclusive evidence about the nexus between price rise and futures trading.

Suggested Citation

  • Pravakar Sahoo & Rajiv Kumar, 2008. "Impact Of Proposed Commodity Transaction Tax On Futures Trading In India," Finance Working Papers 22239, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:financ:22239
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.eaber.org/node/22239
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jeannine Bailliu & Robert Lafrance & Jean-Fran├žois Perrault, 2002. "Does Exchange Rate Policy Matter for Growth?," Staff Working Papers 02-17, Bank of Canada.
    2. McCallum, Bennett T & Nelson, Edward, 2000. "Monetary Policy for an Open Economy: An Alternative Framework with Optimizing Agents and Sticky Prices," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 74-91, Winter.
    3. Carlin Wendy & Soskice David, 2005. "The 3-Equation New Keynesian Model --- A Graphical Exposition," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, pages 1-38.
    4. Bailliu, Jeannine & Lafrance, Robert & Perrault, Jean-Francois, 2003. "Does Exchange Rate Policy Matter for Growth?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(3), pages 381-414, Winter.
    5. Ivan Roberts & Rod Tyers, 2003. "China's Exchange Rate Policy: The Case for Greater Flexibility," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 17(2), pages 155-184, June.
    6. Stanley Fischer, 1984. "Contracts, Credibility, and Disinflation," NBER Working Papers 1339, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Commodity Transaction Tax; Futures Market; Liquidity; Volatility;

    JEL classification:

    • G19 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Other
    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • L71 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Primary Products and Construction - - - Mining, Extraction, and Refining: Hydrocarbon Fuels
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eab:financ:22239. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shiro Armstrong). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/eaberau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.