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Distributional effects of public policy choices

  • Yoseph Yilma Getachew

    ()

    (Durham Business School)

This paper examines the effects of a budget-neutral public spending allocation between public investment and private investment subsidy on inequality dynamics and intergenerational mobility in an environment with heterogenous households and incomplete capital market.

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File URL: http://dro.dur.ac.uk/10334
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Paper provided by Durham University Business School in its series Working Papers with number 2012_04.

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Date of creation: 26 Feb 2012
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Handle: RePEc:dur:durham:2012_04
Contact details of provider: Postal: Durham University Business School, Mill Hill Lane, Durham DH1 3LB, England
Phone: +44 (0)191 334 5200
Fax: +44 (0)191 334 5201
Web page: http://www.dur.ac.uk/business
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  1. Shenggen Fan & Ashok Gulati & Sukhadeo Thorat, 2008. "Investment, subsidies, and pro-poor growth in rural India," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(2), pages 163-170, 09.
  2. Cecilia García-Pe�Alosa & Stephen J. Turnovsky, 2007. "Growth, Income Inequality, and Fiscal Policy: What Are the Relevant Trade-offs?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(2-3), pages 369-394, 03.
  3. Futagami, Koichi & Morita, Yuichi & Shibata, Akihisa, 1993. " Dynamic Analysis of an Endogenous Growth Model with Public Capital," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(4), pages 607-25, December.
  4. Barro, R.J., 1988. "Government Spending In A Simple Model Of Endogenous Growth," RCER Working Papers 130, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  5. George-Marios Angeletos & Laurent Calvet, 2003. "Idiosyncratic Production Risk, Growth, and the Business Cycle," NBER Working Papers 9764, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Roland Benabou, 1999. "Tax and Education Policy in a Heterogeneous Agent Economy: What Levels of Redistribution Maximize Growth and Efficiency?," NBER Working Papers 7132, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Galor, Oded & Zeira, Joseph, 1988. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," MPRA Paper 51644, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Sep 1989.
  8. Getachew, Yoseph Yilma, 2010. "Public capital and distributional dynamics in a two-sector growth model," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 606-616, June.
  9. Revankar, Nagesh S, 1971. "A Class of Variable Elasticity of Substitution Production Functions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 39(1), pages 61-71, January.
  10. Loury, Glenn C, 1981. "Intergenerational Transfers and the Distribution of Earnings," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 843-67, June.
  11. Glomm, Gerhard & Ravikumar, B, 1992. "Public versus Private Investment in Human Capital Endogenous Growth and Income Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 818-34, August.
  12. Olivier de La Grandville & Rainer Klump, 2000. "Economic Growth and the Elasticity of Substitution: Two Theorems and Some Suggestions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 282-291, March.
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