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Rare Events, Financial Crises, and the Cross-Section of Asset Returns

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  • Francesco Bianchi

Abstract

This paper shows that rare events are important in explaining the cross section of asset returns because of their role in shaping agents' expectations. I reconsider the "bad beta, good beta" ICAPM proposed by Campbell and Vuolteenaho and I point out that the explanatory power of the model relies on including the stock market crash that opened the Great Depression. When using a Markov-switching VAR, a '30s regime is identified. This regime receives a large weight when forming expectations consistent with the ICAPM, suggesting that the way agents think about financial markets is shaped by what happens during extreme circumstances. From a technical point of view, the paper extends the present value decomposition of Campbell and Shiller to allow for Markov-switching dynamics in the law of motion of the state variables. This approach could shed new light on the sensitivity of the present value decomposition methodology to the sample choice.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Bianchi, 2010. "Rare Events, Financial Crises, and the Cross-Section of Asset Returns," Working Papers 10-40, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:duk:dukeec:10-40
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    Cited by:

    1. Galsband, Victoria, 2012. "Downside risk of international stock returns," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 2379-2388.
    2. Huang, Wei & Liu, Qianqiu & Ghon Rhee, S. & Wu, Feng, 2012. "Extreme downside risk and expected stock returns," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 1492-1502.
    3. Maio, Paulo, 2013. "Return decomposition and the Intertemporal CAPM," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 4958-4972.
    4. Maio, Paulo & Philip, Dennis, 2015. "Macro variables and the components of stock returns," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 287-308.
    5. repec:eee:macchp:v2-1641 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ran Lu-Andrews & John L. Glascock, 2017. "Liquidity, Price Behavior, and Market-related Events," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 43(2), pages 318-351, March.
    7. John Glascock & Ran Lu-Andrews, 2015. "The Price Behavior of REITs Surrounding Extreme Market-Related Events," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 51(4), pages 441-479, November.
    8. Borovicka, J. & Hansen, L.P., 2016. "Term Structure of Uncertainty in the Macroeconomy," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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