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Using Household Panel Data to Understand the Intergenerational Transmission of Poverty


  • Stephen P. Jenkins
  • Thomas Siedler


This paper discusses how household panel surveys can be informative about the intergenerational transmission of poverty. We consider issues both of data and of the statistical methods that may be applied to those data. Although the data focus is on panel surveys from developed countries, we also briefly consider data availability in developing countries. We set out a list of survey data requirements for intergenerational analysis, and then discuss how the main household panel surveys in developed countries meet the criteria. In order to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of household panel surveys, the section also compares them with other types of longitudinal studies. Next, we review the estimation methods that have been used to examine the intergenerational transmission of poverty when using household panel surveys. Finally, we provide three examples of household panel surveys in developing countries (Indonesia, Malaysia and Mexico) that meet the data requirements for analysis of the intergenerational transmission of poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen P. Jenkins & Thomas Siedler, 2007. "Using Household Panel Data to Understand the Intergenerational Transmission of Poverty," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 694, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp694

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Alwyn Young, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," NBER Working Papers 3577, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Alwyn Young, 1991. "Learning by Doing and the Dynamic Effects of International Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 369-405.
    3. Vollebergh, Herman R.J. & Kemfert, Claudia, 2005. "The role of technological change for a sustainable development," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2-3), pages 133-147, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Spieß & Martin Kroh & Rainer Pischner & Gert G. Wagner, 2008. "On the Treatment of Non-Original Sample Members in the German Household Panel Study (SOEP): Tracing, Weighting, and Frequencies," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 98, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Antonella D’Agostino & Andrea Regoli, 2013. "Life Conditions and Opportunities of Young Adults: Evidence from Italy in European Comparative Perspective," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 113(3), pages 1205-1235, September.
    3. Robert Miller, 2007. "Using Family Histories to Understand the Intergenerational Transmission of Chronic Poverty," Working Papers id:1272, eSocialSciences.

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    Demographic change; Consumption structure; Consumption of the elderly;

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