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How Do Tourists React to Political Violence?: An Empirical Analysis of Tourism in Egypt


  • David Fielding
  • Anja Shortland


This paper uses a detailed database of political violence in Egypt to study European and US tourists' attitudes towards travelling to a conflict region. We use time series analysis to study the heterogeneous impacts of different dimensions of political violence and counter-violence on tourist flows to Egypt in the 1990s. We find that both US and EU tourists respond negatively to attacks on tourists, but do not appear to be influenced by casualties arising in confrontations between domestic groups. However, European tourists are sensitive to the counter-violence measures implemented by the Egyptian government. There is also evidence of tourism in Egypt being affected by the Israeli / Palestinian conflict, with arrivals of tourists into Egypt rising when fatalities in Israel increase.

Suggested Citation

  • David Fielding & Anja Shortland, 2010. "How Do Tourists React to Political Violence?: An Empirical Analysis of Tourism in Egypt," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1022, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1022

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Perroni, Carlo & Rutherford, Thomas F, 1998. "A Comparison of the Performance of Flexible Functional Forms for Use in Applied General Equilibrium Modelling," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 11(3), pages 245-263, June.
    2. Böhringer, Christoph & Rutherford, Thomas F. & Tol, Richard S. J., 2009. "The EU 20/20/2020 Targets: An Overview of the EMF22 Assessment," Papers WP325, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    3. Paul K. Gorecki & Seán Lyons & Richard S. J. Tol, 2009. "EU Climate Change Policy 2013-2020: Using the Clean Development Mechanism More Effectively," Papers WP299, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
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    1. The impact of political violence on tourism
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2010-08-10 19:10:00

    More about this item


    Tourism; political violence; Egypt;

    JEL classification:

    • P48 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Political Economy; Legal Institutions; Property Rights; Natural Resources; Energy; Environment; Regional Studies
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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