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Socio-metabolic Transitions in Developing Asia

Author

Listed:
  • Heinz Schandl
  • Marina Fischer-Kowalski
  • Clemens Grunbuhel
  • Fridolin Krausmann

    () (CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems, Australia)

Abstract

A possible sustainability transition in developing Asia needs to complement the ongoing transition from an agrarian to an industrial socio-ecological regime. As is known from other world regions, an agrarian-industrial transition involves a major increase in material and energy flows (corresponding to a 2-4 fold increase in the demand for raw materials and energy). The socio-metabolic profile of the South-East Asian region still shows relatively low material and energy consumption per capita, suggesting that major growth may follow. Infrastructures that are closely bound-up in bulk material flows (transport, energy and food sectors) will be critical to future developments. The paper illustrates the challenge and potential solutions from a number of case studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Heinz Schandl & Marina Fischer-Kowalski & Clemens Grunbuhel & Fridolin Krausmann, 2008. "Socio-metabolic Transitions in Developing Asia," Socio-Economics and the Environment in Discussion (SEED) Working Paper Series 2008-05, CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems.
  • Handle: RePEc:cse:wpaper:2008-05
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    File URL: http://www.csiro.au/files/files/pka3.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2008
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Isabel Gallego-Álvarez & Mª Galindo-Villardón & Miguel Rodríguez-Rosa, 2015. "Analysis of the Sustainable Society Index Worldwide: A Study from the Biplot Perspective," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 120(1), pages 29-65, January.
    2. Vallejo, Maria Cristina, 2010. "Biophysical structure of the Ecuadorian economy, foreign trade, and policy implications," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 159-169, December.
    3. West, James & Schandl, Heinz & Krausmann, Fridolin & Kovanda, Jan & Hak, Tomas, 2014. "Patterns of change in material use and material efficiency in the successor states of the former Soviet Union," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 211-219.
    4. Fander Falconí & María Cristina Vallejo, 2012. "Transiciones socioecológicas en la región andina," Revista Iberoamericana de Economía Ecológica, Red Iberoamericana de Economía Ecológica, vol. 18, pages 53-71, Abril.
    5. Clive L Spash & Heinz Schandl, 2009. "Growth, the Environment and Keynes: Reflections on Two Heterodox Schools of Thought," Socio-Economics and the Environment in Discussion (SEED) Working Paper Series 2009-01, CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    socio-ecological regime; metabolic profile; industrial transformation; developing Asia; sustainability transition;

    JEL classification:

    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • N50 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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