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Modelling the Surrender Conditions in Equity-Linked Life Insurance


  • Anna Rita Bacinello

    () (Dipartimento di Matematica Applicata alle Scienze Economiche, Statistiche ed Attuariali, University of Trieste)


We propose a model for pricing a unit-linked life insurance policy embedding a surrender option. We consider both single and annual premium contracts. First we analyse a quite general contract, for which we obtain a backward recursive valuation formula based on the Cox, Ross and Rubinstein (1979) binomial model. Then we concentrate upon a particular case, that is the famous model with exogenous minimum guarantees. In this case we extend our previous analysis in order to take into account the possibility that the guarantees at death or maturity and the surrender values are endogenously determined, and provide necessary and sucient conditions for the premiums to be well defined.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Rita Bacinello, 2005. "Modelling the Surrender Conditions in Equity-Linked Life Insurance," CeRP Working Papers 39, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
  • Handle: RePEc:crp:wpaper:39

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Nadine Gatzert & Gudrun Hoermann & Hato Schmeiser, 2009. "The Impact of the Secondary Market on Life Insurers' Surrender Profits," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 76(4), pages 887-908.
    2. Russo, Vincenzo & Giacometti, Rosella & Fabozzi, Frank J., 2017. "Intensity-based framework for surrender modeling in life insurance," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 189-196.
    3. Gerstner, Thomas & Griebel, Michael & Holtz, Markus & Goschnick, Ralf & Haep, Marcus, 2008. "A general asset-liability management model for the efficient simulation of portfolios of life insurance policies," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 704-716, April.

    More about this item


    surrender option; equity-linked life insurance; exogenous and endogenous guarantees; single and annual premium contracts; binomial trees;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors

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