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Migration Theory and Evidence: An Assessment

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  • Ghatak, Subrata
  • Levine, Paul L

Abstract

This paper presents a critical survey of theories of migration, their welfare and policy implications and their empirical relevance. We also develop some extensions to the theory beginning with a general encompassing model of migration which treats the Harris and Todaro (HT) model as a special case. In particular, we show how standard policy, a reduction of the wage gap between an advanced and a backward region to reduce the rate of migration, follows from the standard model, but ceases to be valid if borrowing constraints on the potential migrant are introduced. The HT model is extended to examine risk-averse behaviour within families where the migration of members of families serves to diversify risk. The welfare implications of the individual migration decision and government intervention in the form of employment subsidies are also examined.

Suggested Citation

  • Ghatak, Subrata & Levine, Paul L, 1993. "Migration Theory and Evidence: An Assessment," CEPR Discussion Papers 769, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:769
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tobias Ketterer & Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, 2015. "Local quality of government and voting with one’s feet," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 55(2), pages 501-532, December.
    2. Ketterer, Tobias & Rodriguez-Pose, Andres, 2014. "Local quality of government and migration. Evidence for European regions," CEPR Discussion Papers 9986, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Stephen Drinkwater & Paul Levine & Emanuela Lotti & Joseph Pearlman, 2003. "The Economic Impact of Migration: A Survey," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0103, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    4. Stefano Mainardi, 2004. "Regional Disparities and Migration: Linear and Switching Model Estimations for Poland," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(7), pages 767-781.
    5. Benjamin Powell, 2012. "Coyote ugly: the deadweight cost of rent seeking for immigration policy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 150(1), pages 195-208, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employment Subsidies; Harris-Todaro; Migration;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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