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Supply of renewable energy sources and the cost of EU climate policy

  • Stefan Boeters

    ()

  • J. Koornneef

What are the excess costs of a separate 20% target for renewable energy as a part of the EU climate policy for 2020? We answer this question using a computable general equilibrium model, WorldScan, which has been extended with a bottom-up module of the electricity sector. The model set-up makes it possible to directly use available estimates of costs and capacity potentials for renewable energy sources for calibration. In our base case simulation, the costs of EU climate policy with the renewables target are 6% higher than those of a policy without this target. As information on the supply of renewable energy is scarce and uncertain, we perform an extensive sensitivity analysis with respect to the level and steepness of the supply curves for wind energy and biomass. In the range we explore, the excess costs vary from zero (when the target is not binding) to 23% (when the cost progression and the initial cost disadvantage for renewables are doubled).

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Paper provided by CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis in its series CPB Discussion Paper with number 142.

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Date of creation: Feb 2010
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Handle: RePEc:cpb:discus:142
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  1. Katja Schumacher & Ronald D. Sands, 2006. "Where Are the Industrial Technologies in Energy-Economy Models?: An Innovative CGE Approach for Steel Production in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 605, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Messner, Sabine & Schrattenholzer, Leo, 2000. "MESSAGE–MACRO: linking an energy supply model with a macroeconomic module and solving it iteratively," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 267-282.
  3. McFarland, J. R. & Reilly, J. M. & Herzog, H. J., 2004. "Representing energy technologies in top-down economic models using bottom-up information," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 685-707, July.
  4. Stefan Boeters & Ton Manders & Gerard Verweij & M.G.J. den Elzen & Veenendaal. P.J.J., 2007. "Post-2012 climate policy scenarios," CPB Special Publication 70, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  5. Jean-Charles Hourcade, Mark Jaccard, Chris Bataille, and Frederic Ghersi , 2006. "Hybrid Modeling: New Answers to Old Challenges Introduction to the Special Issue of The Energy Journal," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 1-12.
  6. Resch, Gustav & Held, Anne & Faber, Thomas & Panzer, Christian & Toro, Felipe & Haas, Reinhard, 2008. "Potentials and prospects for renewable energies at global scale," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 4048-4056, November.
  7. Doukas, Haris & Mannsbart, Wilhelm & Patlitzianas, Konstantinos D. & Psarras, John & Ragwitz, Mario & Schlomann, Barbara, 2007. "A methodology for validating the renewable energy data in EU," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 32(12), pages 1981-1998.
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