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Multilateralism Beyond Doha

  • Arvind Subramanian

    ()

  • Aaditya Mattoo

There is a fundamental shift taking place in the world economy to which the multilateral trading system has failed to adapt. The Doha process focused on issues of limited significance while the burning issues of the day were not even on the negotiating agenda. The paper advances five propositions: (i) the traditional negotiating dynamic, driven by private sector interests largely in the rich countries, is running out of steam; (ii) the world economy is moving broadly from conditions of relative abundance to relative scarcity, and so economic security has become a paramount concern for consumers, workers, and ordinary citizens; (iii) international economic integration can contribute to enhanced security; (iv) addressing these new concerns – relating to food, energy and economic security - requires a wider agenda of multilateral cooperation, involving not just the WTO but other multilateral institutions; and (v) despite shifts in economic power across countries, the commonality of interests and scope for give-and-take on these new issues make multilateral cooperation worth attempting.

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Paper provided by Center for Global Development in its series Working Papers with number 153.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cgd:wpaper:153
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.cgdev.org

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  1. Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Yee Wong & Ketki Sheth, 2006. "US-China Trade Disputes: Rising Tides Rising Stakes," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number pa78.
  2. Aaditya Mattoo & Arvind Subramanian, 2008. "Currency Undervaluation and Sovereign Wealth Funds: A New Role for the World Trade Organization," Working Paper Series WP08-2, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  3. Luci Ellis & Kathryn Smith, 2007. "The global upward trend in the profit share," BIS Working Papers 231, Bank for International Settlements.
  4. Joseph Francois & Will Martin, 2002. "Commercial Policy Variability, Bindings, and Market Access," International Trade 0210002, EconWPA.
  5. Subramanian, Arvind & Wei, Shang-Jin, 2005. "The WTO Promotes Trade, Strongly But Unevenly," CEPR Discussion Papers 5122, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Mitchell, Donald, 2008. "A note on rising food prices," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4682, The World Bank.
  7. Gootiiz, Batshur & Mattoo, Aaditya, 2009. "Services in Doha : what's on the table ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4903, The World Bank.
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