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Innovation, Productivity and Export: the case of Hungary


  • László Halpern
  • Balázs Muraközy


This paper estimates the relationship between innovation and firm performance by using Community Innovation Survey data for Hungary. It exploits the possibility of linking the innovation data to ownership and disaggregated trade data. Innovative firms are more productive, more likely to trade and export into more countries. Foreign firms are more likely to innovate compared to similar domestic firms, but the amount of R&D is a weaker predictor of the innovative output of foreign firms.

Suggested Citation

  • László Halpern & Balázs Muraközy, 2009. "Innovation, Productivity and Export: the case of Hungary," CeFiG Working Papers 10, Center for Firms in the Global Economy, revised 02 Dec 2009.
  • Handle: RePEc:cfg:cfigwp:10

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bronwyn Hall & Jacques Mairesse, 2006. "Empirical studies of innovation in the knowledge-driven economy," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4-5), pages 289-299.
    2. Richard Baldwin & James Harrigan, 2011. "Zeros, Quality, and Space: Trade Theory and Trade Evidence," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 60-88, May.
    3. Rachel Griffith & Elena Huergo & Jacques Mairesse & Bettina Peters, 2006. "Innovation and Productivity Across Four European Countries," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 483-498, Winter.
    4. Crespi, Gustavo & Criscuolo, Chiara & Haskel, Jonathan E. & Slaughter, Matthew, 2007. "Productivity growth, knowledge flows and spillovers," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19735, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Bruno Crepon & Emmanuel Duguet & Jacques Mairesse, 1998. "Research, Innovation And Productivity: An Econometric Analysis At The Firm Level," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(2), pages 115-158.
    6. Johnson, Robert C., 2012. "Trade and prices with heterogeneous firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 43-56.
    7. Polder, Michael & Leeuwen, George van & Mohnen, Pierre & Raymond, Wladimir, 2009. "Productivity effects of innovation modes," MPRA Paper 18893, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:krk:eberjl:v:2:y:2014:i:4:p:9-29 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Justin Doran & Eoin O'Leary, 2016. "The Innovation Performance of Irish and Foreign-owned Firms: The Roles of R&D and Networking," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(9), pages 1384-1398, September.
    3. Pinto, Hugo & Cruz, Ana Rita & Combe, Colin, 2015. "Cooperation and the emergence of maritime clusters in the Atlantic: Analysis and implications of innovation and human capital for blue growth," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 167-177.
    4. Joachim Wagner, 2016. "A survey of empirical studies using transaction level data on exports and imports," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 152(1), pages 215-225, February.
    5. Sharma, Chandan & Mishra, Ritesh Kumar, 2015. "International trade and performance of firms: Unraveling export, import and productivity puzzle," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 61-74.
    6. repec:mgt:youmgt:v:15:y:2017:i:1:p:43-60 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Naqeeb Ur Rehman, 2017. "Self-selection and learning-by-exporting hypotheses: micro-level evidence," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 7(1), pages 133-160, April.
    8. Alena Zemplinerová & Eva Hromádková, 2012. "Determinants of Firm´s Innovation," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2012(4), pages 487-503.
    9. Jesus Lopez-Rodriguez & Diego Martinez, 2014. "Beyond the R&D effects on innovation: the contribution of non-R&D activities to TFP growth in the EU," Working Papers 2014/16, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    10. Joachim Wagner, 2015. "R&D activities and extensive margins of exports in manufacturing enterprises: First evidence for Germany," Working Paper Series in Economics 343, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
    11. Alfons Palangkaraya & Thomas Spurling & Elizabeth Webster, 2015. "Does Innovation Make (SME) Firms More Productive?," RBA Annual Conference Volume,in: Angus Moore & John Simon (ed.), Small Business Conditions and Finance Reserve Bank of Australia.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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