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Lattices and Lotteries in Apportioning Risk

Listed author(s):
  • Harris Schlesinger

Although risk aversion has been used in economic models for over 275 years, the past few decades have shown how higher order risk attitudes are also quite important. A behavioral approach to defining such risk attitudes was developed by Eeckhoudt and Schlesinger (2006), based upon simple lottery preference. This article show how the mathematics of lattice theory can be used to model these lottery preferences. In addition to modeling a simple lattice structure, I show how such lattices can be extended in order to develop a better understanding of higher order risk attitudes.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp5067.pdf
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Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 5067.

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Date of creation: 2014
Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_5067
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  1. Eeckhoudt, Louis & Schlesinger, Harris & Tsetlin, Ilia, 2009. "Apportioning of risks via stochastic dominance," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 144(3), pages 994-1003, May.
  2. Louis Eeckhoudt & Harris Schlesinger, 2006. "Putting Risk in Its Proper Place," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(1), pages 280-289, March.
  3. David Crainich & Louis Eeckhoudt & Alain Trannoy, 2013. "Even (Mixed) Risk Lovers Are Prudent," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(4), pages 1529-1535, June.
  4. Louis Eeckhoudt, 2012. "Beyond Risk Aversion: Why, How and What's Next?*," The Geneva Risk and Insurance Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics (The Geneva Association), vol. 37(2), pages 141-155, September.
  5. Jokung, Octave, 2011. "Risk apportionment via bivariate stochastic dominance," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(4-5), pages 448-452.
  6. Sebastian Ebert, 2013. "Even (Mixed) Risk Lovers Are Prudent: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(4), pages 1536-1537, June.
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