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Towards the Resilient Region?: Policy Activism and Peripheral Region Development


  • Stuart Dawley
  • Andy Pike
  • John Tomaney


Discussions of local and regional development have recently broadened from a preoccupation with growth to one which captures the notion of resilience. This paper makes two main contributions to these debates. First, the paper critiques static equilibrium-based notions of resilience and instead advances a more dynamic evolutionary approach to explain local and regional resilience. Second, we seek to address the widening gap between resilience thinking and its transfer to practical policy prescription. To do this, we explore the notions of adaptability, adaptive capacity and new path creation in developing local and regional resilience. We then focus upon what this might mean for local and regional strategies and draw on the case study of the Renewable Energy sector in North East England to demonstrate the enduring role of policy intervention in stimulating change and building resilience in peripheral regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Stuart Dawley & Andy Pike & John Tomaney, 2010. "Towards the Resilient Region?: Policy Activism and Peripheral Region Development," SERC Discussion Papers 0053, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0053

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    More about this item


    Resilience; adaptability; adaptation;

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • R00 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General - - - General

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