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Economics of a good night's sleep

Author

Listed:
  • Joan Costa-i-Font
  • Sarah Flèche

Abstract

Parents whose sleep quality is reduced by young children waking them in the night are less likely to work, work shorter hours and/or earn less than otherwise similar people who enjoy a good night's sleep. The negative labour market effects of sleep disruption caused by children are particularly strong for low-skilled mothers. These are among the findings of research by Joan Costa-i-Font and Sarah Flèche, which uses data on 14,000 families in and around the city of Bristol in the UK to investigate the link between mothers' employment outcomes and their quality of sleep, measured by how much they are woken by their children at night. The researchers note that before now, the effects of sleep deprivation on economic activity have received surprisingly scant attention.

Suggested Citation

  • Joan Costa-i-Font & Sarah Flèche, 2017. "Economics of a good night's sleep," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 506, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepcnp:506
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    File URL: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp506.pdf
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    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Economics of a good night’s sleep
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2017-08-11 17:45:56

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child sleep; sleep; maternal employment; working hours; job satisfaction;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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