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Unequal Britain: How Real Are Regional Disparities?


  • Steve Gibbons
  • Henry Overman


Average earnings vary widely across the regions of Britain, a fact that has prompted many decades of policies aimed at reducing regional disparities. But as Henry Overman and Steve Gibbons demonstrate, such variation reveals little, especially if we ignore regional differences in the cost of living and availability of local amenities.

Suggested Citation

  • Steve Gibbons & Henry Overman, 2011. "Unequal Britain: How Real Are Regional Disparities?," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 353, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepcnp:353

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    wage; disparities; labour; Britain; spatial equilibrium; amenity value; housing market;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • R29 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Other

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