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The Restructuring and Privatisation of the Peruvian Electricity Distribution Market

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  • Anaya, K.L.

Abstract

This paper attempts to assess the social welfare impact of the restructuring and privatisation of the electricity market in Peru. The target companies, Electrolima and Electro Sur Medio, account for 64 per cent of the total distribution market and 100 per cent of the privatised distribution companies respectively. Actual and counterfactual operating costs are examined. A separate analysis is performed for each company, due to the differences in terms of economies of scale and market structure. The benefits of being connected were also computed based on counterfactual scenarios. Companies that were not privatised (benchmark companies) were used for making appropriate comparisons and for determining our preferred counterfactual cost decline. Benchmark companies were also important for analysing the trend in quality issues. The results show that privatisation was worthwhile and that the social welfare of being connected has an important contribution on it. Government and producers benefited the most and consumers the least due to price increase.

Suggested Citation

  • Anaya, K.L., 2010. "The Restructuring and Privatisation of the Peruvian Electricity Distribution Market," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1017, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:1017
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pollitt, Michael G., 2012. "The role of policy in energy transitions: Lessons from the energy liberalisation era," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 128-137.
    2. Nepal, Rabindra & Foster, John, 2015. "Electricity networks privatization in Australia: An overview of the debate," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 12-24.
    3. Melitz, Jacques, 2012. "A framework for analyzing language and welfare," CEPR Discussion Papers 9091, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Rabindra, Nepal & Tooraj, Jamasb, 2013. "Caught Between Theory and Practice: Government, Market, and Regulatory Failure in Electricity Sector Reforms," SIRE Discussion Papers 2013-22, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    5. Erdogdu, Erkan, 2011. "The impact of power market reforms on electricity price-cost margins and cross-subsidy levels: A cross country panel data analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 1080-1092, March.
    6. Tooraj Jamasb & Rabindra Nepal & Govinda Timilsina & Michael Toman, 2014. "Energy Sector Reform, Economic Efficiency and Poverty Reduction," Discussion Papers Series 529, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    7. Jamasb,Tooraj & Nepal,Rabindra & Timilsina,Govinda R., 2015. "A quarter century effort yet to come of age : a survey of power sector reforms in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7330, The World Bank.
    8. Nepal, Rabindra & Jamasb, Tooraj, 2015. "Caught between theory and practice: Government, market, and regulatory failure in electricity sector reforms," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 16-24.
    9. Daisy Shen & Qing Yang, . "Electricity Market Regulatory Reform and Competition – Case Study of the New Zealand Electricity Market," Chapters, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA).
    10. Erdogdu, Erkan, 2013. "Essays on Electricity Market Reforms: A Cross-Country Applied Approach," MPRA Paper 47139, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cost benefit analysis; restructuring and privatisation; electricity market; Peru;

    JEL classification:

    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate
    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities

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