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International Support for Domestic Climate Policies

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Abstract

Domestic climate policies play an important part in shifting countries towards a low-carbon development trajectory. Six case studies explore the domestic drivers and barriers for policies with climate (co-)benefits in developing countries. International support can help to overcome these constraints by providing additional resources for incremental policy costs, technical assistance, and technology cooperation to build local capacity. Any such cooperation has to build on domestic stakeholder support for policies with climate co-benefits. Policy indicators play an important role for successful policy implementation. They facilitate monitoring of intermediate policy outcomes, international comparison of best practice, internal management for effective implementation and can be linked to international incentive schemes. As they are more responsive to successful implementation, indicators can be aligned with political time scales to provide early reward and reduce the uncertainty associated with predicting the long-term impacts of transformational policies on emissions reductions.

Suggested Citation

  • Neuhoff, K., 2009. "International Support for Domestic Climate Policies," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0909, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0909
    Note: Faculty
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    File URL: http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/research-files/repec/cam/pdf/cwpe0909.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Boyd, Anya, 2012. "Informing international UNFCCC technology mechanisms from the ground up: Using biogas technology in South Africa as a case study to evaluate the usefulness of potential elements of an international te," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 301-311.
    2. Jun Li & Michel Colombier, 2011. "Economic instruments for mitigating carbon emissions: scaling up carbon finance in China’s buildings sector," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 107(3), pages 567-591, August.
    3. Samantha DeMartino, David Le Blanc, 2010. "Estimating the Amount of a Global Feed-in Tariff for Renewable Electricity," Working Papers 95, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Policy instrument; international cooperation; intermediate indicators; climate policy;

    JEL classification:

    • D78 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Positive Analysis of Policy Formulation and Implementation
    • H0 - Public Economics - - General
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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