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The European Crisis and the role of the financial system

Author

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  • Vitor Constancio

    (European Central Bank)

Abstract

The paper aims to provide a deep rationale for banking union in the Euro Area. It shows that the banking sectors of core and peripheral countries were responsible for financing the credit boom that created the imbalances and vulnerabilities that later were at the centre of the crisis. The increase of debt ratios in the periphery until 2007 was more significant for the private sector than for the public sector. The crisis has been as much a banking crisis as a sovereign debt crisis and to avoid similar future risks a European Supervisor and a Resolution Authority are essential.

Suggested Citation

  • Vitor Constancio, 2013. "The European Crisis and the role of the financial system," Special Conference Papers 15, Bank of Greece.
  • Handle: RePEc:bog:spaper:15
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alexander Popov & Neeltje van Horen, 2013. "The impact of sovereign debt exposure on bank lending: Evidence from the European debt crisis," DNB Working Papers 382, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    2. Alter, Adrian & Beyer, Andreas, 2014. "The dynamics of spillover effects during the European sovereign debt turmoil," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 134-153.
    3. Schoenmaker, Dirk, 2011. "The financial trilemma," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 57-59, April.
    4. Goodhart, Ch. A. E. & Kashyap, A. K. & Tsomocos, D. P. & Vardoulakis, A. P., 2012. "Financial Regulation in General Equilibrium," Working papers 372, Banque de France.
    5. Smets, Frank & Collard, Fabrice & Boissay, Frédéric, 2013. "Booms and systemic banking crises," Working Paper Series 1514, European Central Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Hartmann, Philipp & Smets, Frank, 2018. "The first twenty years of the European Central Bank: monetary policy," Working Paper Series 2219, European Central Bank.
    2. Roberta De Santis & Tatiana Cesaroni, 2016. "Current Account ‘Core–Periphery Dualism’ in the EMU," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(10), pages 1514-1538, October.
    3. Jerome Creel & Paul Hubert & Fabien Labondance, 2015. "The intertwining of financialisation and financial instability," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-14, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    4. Theodoros S. Papaspyrou, 2015. "EMU 2.0 Drawing Lessons From the Crisis - a New Framework For Stability and Growth," Working Papers 192, Bank of Greece.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    European crisis; banking union; fiscal and macroeconomic imbalances;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H63 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - Debt; Debt Management; Sovereign Debt
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises

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